Counseling Today, Online Exclusives

What was your ‘turning point’ as a counselor?

October 29, 2013

(Photo by Paul Sakuma Photography)

(Photo by Paul Sakuma Photography)

Counseling Today is compiling information for an article about different “turning points” in counselors’ careers — experiences or revelations that fundamentally changed how they approach their life’s work. Have you had such a turning point, perhaps because of working with a certain client or population, learning a new technique or approach, overcoming a particularly difficult challenge or even discovering something new about yourself? If so, Counseling Today would be interested in hearing about it and possibly sharing the experience with other ACA members, either in the monthly magazine or at CT Online. If you are interested in participating, send the following information to CT editor-in-chief Jonathan Rollins at jrollins@counseling.org: Your name, number of years in the counseling profession, current work position and location, how you approached counseling before your turning point, how you have approached counseling since that turning point, and the major “lesson” or bit of wisdom you would pass on to others. 

1 Comment

  1. Sue Kucklick

    I was working as a security guard at the state hospital. I joined a police organization and started making crime prevention presentations, and learned about the alarmingly high rate of victimization the patients experienced. I became interested in the effect trauma had on the people I was seeing there in the hospital and learned about a diagnosis called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. None of the admitting doctors ever used it. It really hit home one day when a distraught woman was brought into the admitting area and I spoke to her. She explained that she had been robbed at gunpoint a couple of months before and had been having problems since them. I asked her a few questions–I wasn’t a clinician. I said it sounds like she had trauma symptoms. All the tenseness suddenly left her body and she started breathing differently. That was the moment I decided counseling might be the field for me.

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