Monthly Archives: June 2018

It’s not about ‘clean’: Dismantling the language of HIV stigma

By J. Richelle Joe and Sarah B. Parkin June 5, 2018

Words matter. The language we use when discussing sensitive, controversial or stigmatized topics reflects and shapes our attitudes and beliefs about those topics. Such is the case with HIV and AIDS. Since being widely identified in the 1980s, HIV and AIDS have been perceived negatively by the general public, resulting in the pervasive use of language that characterizes those living with the virus or the disease as undesirable and even dangerous.

The counseling context is not immune to such damaging language, and it is reasonable to infer that words have a powerful influence on mental health and counseling outcomes for people living with HIV. Counselors must beware of the power of language; outdated information about HIV and AIDS can intersect with the inadvertent use of stigmatizing language and undermine the ethical principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence that form the foundation of our profession. We also have a responsibility to actively oppose HIV- and AIDS-related bias and stigma by educating ourselves about HIV and AIDS and changing the language we use when discussing them.

Let’s start by offering a quick guide to HIV and AIDS terminology:

  • HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus; people can be diagnosed with HIV and not have an AIDS diagnosis
  • AIDS: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; caused by HIV
  • CD4 cells: Cells that are a part of the body’s immune system; also known as T cells
  • Viral load: The amount of HIV particles in the body
  • Opportunistic infections: Illnesses, including certain types of cancer, that occur more often when someone has a weakened immune system
  • ART: Antiretroviral therapy, a common treatment for HIV
  • PrEP: Pre-exposure prophylaxis, daily medication that can reduce one’s risk of contracting HIV
  • PEP: Post-exposure prophylaxis; prescribed use of ART within 72 hours of a possible exposure to HIV
  • Viral suppression: When the amount of HIV particles in an individual’s system decreases to the point that the virus is not detectable by current tests; occurs when an individual is adherent to treatment; also known as having an undetectable viral load

The changing face of HIV and AIDS

In the United States, AIDS was originally called GRID (gay-related immune deficiency), and the illness was most commonly associated with gay white males. Although the name of the illness changed as it became apparent that minority sexual orientation was not a determinant of HIV transmission, AIDS continued to be viewed as a “gay disease,” with multiple layers of associated stigma.

Although the stigma remains, the demographics of individuals living with HIV have shifted and increasingly include women and individuals of color. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women account for approximately 20 percent of new HIV diagnoses, and among African American women, the estimated lifetime risk of an HIV diagnosis is 1 in 54 (compared with 1 in 941 for white women). African American and Latinx communities are disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS. This is largely as a result of social determinants of health such as access to accurate information, preventive methods and health care, which are influenced by geographic location, cultural and social beliefs, socioeconomics, and stigma about sex and sexuality.

As the demographics related to HIV and AIDS have changed since the 1980s, so has the scientific knowledge, leading to key advancements in HIV prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Today, people with HIV can live long, healthy lives, provided that they adhere to treatment and monitor other aspects of their health.

Unfortunately, much of what is commonly known about HIV and AIDS is outdated and inaccurate. For instance, recent surveys conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation indicated that some Americans still believe that HIV can be transmitted via mosquito bites, shared eating utensils and toilet seats. Many Americans also instinctively associate HIV with death, despite critical advancements in HIV care.

HIV is not a death sentence. For individuals living with HIV, the key to their health is the strength of their immune systems as measured by their CD4 cell count and viral load. Ideally, the goal for people living with HIV is to have a high CD4 cell count and a low viral load. Fortunately, as a result of significant medical advances over the past few decades, individuals with HIV who are consistent in their adherence to ART can have a viral load that is undetectable. Studies have shown, and the CDC has affirmed, that individual with undetectable viral loads have almost zero chance of transmitting HIV to another person even if other protective measures are not present. Never before in the history of HIV and AIDS has there been such hope for HIV prevention generally and people living with HIV specifically.

Unfortunately, not all individuals living with HIV access care and have an undetectable viral load. According to the CDC, approximately 1.1 million Americans are currently living with HIV, with 85 percent of these individuals aware of their HIV status. However, only 62 percent of Americans living with HIV are engaged in care, and only 49 percent of individuals living with HIV have an undetectable viral load. Multiple factors, including public health policies and social determinants of health, contribute to these statistics.

Unaddressed mental health needs might also be at work. People living with HIV may experience adjustment difficulties, depression, anxiety and trauma — all of which can affect an individual’s willingness and ability to seek medical care and remain adherent to treatment. In the past, HIV care focused primarily on the medical needs of people living with HIV. Today, there is growing awareness of the need to address the psychological and emotional aspects of HIV and AIDS because those factors may affect overall wellness.

The power of language

Despite the hope that science has given us with respect to HIV prevention and treatment and the increased awareness of the need for mental health support for people living with HIV, the language frequently used to describe HIV and AIDS continues to bolster the stigma associated with the illness.

Whereas phrases such as “clean bill of health” are benign with respect to other illnesses, when used in connection with HIV and AIDS, they can have a much different connotation. For instance, use of the word “clean” to describe someone who does not have an HIV diagnosis can send the message that those who are HIV positive are somehow unclean and dirty, or even impure and sinful. But HIV is not about clean. Not having an HIV diagnosis is not a determinant of cleanliness or good moral character. Equally, having an HIV diagnosis has nothing to do with being dirty or having loose morals.

Similarly, referring to HIV “infections” rather than HIV diagnoses or transmissions conjures thoughts of contamination, impurity and even death. Simply put, the dichotomy of “clean” versus “infected” breeds stigma, negativity and hopelessness. These negative connotations make getting tested, disclosing one’s HIV status, discussing methods of protection, and accessing and staying in care more difficult.

When counselors inadvertently use stigmatizing language in reference to HIV and AIDS, they risk harming clients by perpetuating stigma and reinforcing barriers to both physical and mental health care. By reducing stigma through intentional language choices, counselors can better help individuals explore their options for entering care or identify potential barriers that may prevent them from staying in care in the future. Additionally, helping clients identify protective factors such as support systems, positive coping strategies and individual strengths can be beneficial to their growth and development.

Regardless of HIV status, and in the name of balance, it is also important for counselors to inquire about aspects of their clients’ sexual wellness when the topic arises. As previously mentioned, with clients who are living with HIV, counselors can discuss getting and staying in care. With clients who are not living with HIV, counselors can use psychoeducation to identify appropriate prevention methods, including PrEP, PEP and proper condom use.

 

 

Say this, not that

Recognizing the negative impact that stigmatizing language has on individuals is only the first step toward defusing the taboo of HIV and AIDS. The next step is to identify specific stigmatizing phrases and replace them with appropriate alternatives.

On a foundational level, counselors can make an easy change in their communication about HIV and AIDS simply by using person-first language. Saying “person living with HIV” rather than “AIDS patient” does several things. First, it builds the therapeutic relationship and helps to externalize the diagnosis rather than fusing it with the client’s identity. Second, person-first language decreases stigma by emphasizing the possibility of living, and living well, with HIV.

The use of “person living with HIV” rather than “AIDS patient” also reflects a more accurate understanding of the illness and its progression. Often, HIV and AIDS are used interchangeably, despite an important medical distinction between the two. For counselors, it is essential to accurately differentiate between an HIV diagnosis and an AIDS diagnosis.

An HIV diagnosis follows a reactive test for the HIV virus; however, a diagnosis of AIDS is given by a physician only if an individual’s CD4 cell count is below 200 or if the individual develops certain opportunistic infections. Given that effective treatment is available for individuals who have been diagnosed with HIV, it is likely that someone who is adherent to treatment will never receive an AIDS diagnosis. By ignoring the difference between these two diagnoses, a counselor might appear to be invalidating, deterministic and incompetent to a client who is living with HIV.

Additionally, the phrase “full-blown AIDS” needs to be retired from our collective vocabulary. This phrase — which bolsters fear, reinforces HIV stigma and conjures thoughts of death — is wholly inaccurate and is no longer used among medical professionals. Along the same lines, stating that someone “died from AIDS” is also unproductive and inaccurate. If HIV progresses to the point that an AIDS diagnosis is given, an individual is vulnerable to opportunistic infections, which could be fatal. Hence, an individual might die from an opportunistic infection or an AIDS-related illness but not from AIDS itself.

Accuracy in our language when discussing this particular illness is critical. Errors in our word choices can communicate misinformation and harm clients, adding to the barriers that often prevent clients with HIV from seeking medical and mental health care services.

Conclusion

Understandably, discussing HIV and AIDS can be awkward or uncomfortable for some individuals, including counselors. However, equipped with the right language, counselors can engage their clients in vital conversations about their sexual and mental health. By discussing HIV transmission rather than infection, we can destigmatize the illness and the conversation. We can disrupt the pervasive narrative that equates HIV and AIDS with death, uncleanliness and immorality. And most important, we can be bridges rather than barriers so that people living with HIV will feel encouraged and empowered to access care and live well.

 

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J. Richelle Joe is an assistant professor of counselor education at the University of Central Florida. Her work focuses on HIV prevention and culturally and ethically sound services for people affected by HIV or AIDS. Contact her at jacqueline.joe@ucf.edu.

Sarah B. Parkin is a master’s student in clinical mental health counseling at the University of Central Florida. Her research interests focus on intersectionality and marginalized communities.

Letters to the editor: ct@counseling.org

Counseling Today reviews unsolicited articles written by American Counseling Association members. To access writing guidelines and tips for having an article accepted for publication, go to ct.counseling.org/feedback.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

 

Self-care for the activist counselor

By Shekila Melchior and Dannette Gomez Beane June 4, 2018

An activist is a person who campaigns and takes action for social change. Counselors are often activists for their clients and for their profession by nature of being in a helping field.

The issue of self-care looms for both counselor practitioners and counselor educators as we face difficult client issues, large caseloads and demanding work environments. The need for self-care only intensifies when societal issues grow more divisive and combative, as we have experienced over the past year or more. Contentious social movements and issues such as #BlackLivesMatter and immigration can have an impact on the climate of care we provide as counselors for our clients and for the communities in which we live.

A tale of two doctoral students

Being a doctoral counseling student is stressful. Being a doctoral counseling student whose research is directly affected by the social movements and climate of the nation is even more stressful.

Shekila’s journey

When I (Shekila Melchior) chose my dissertation topic, “The Social Justice Identity Development of School Counselors Who Advocate for Undocumented Students,” in spring 2016, I had no idea what lay ahead. At the time of my data collection, a heated and divisive presidential election was unfolding in which the issue of undocumented immigration had turned into a political platform. The United States was inundated with xenophobic remarks, anti-immigrant rhetoric and the proposition of erecting physical structures to prevent individuals from entering the country.

On Election Day, concern turned to fear for many people who were confronted with the harsh reality of an unstable future — namely, that their ability to continue residing in the United States was in peril. After the election of President Donald Trump, I questioned whether anyone would participate in my research interviews regarding undocumented students. The climate in our country had changed, but my timeline for defending my research had not.

As an advocate, I was flooded with messages about protest marches and prompting me to write to Congress and participate in meetings to educate others. As a friend, I listened to the concerns of those closest to me who were fearful of deportation and of the possible termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, implemented by the Obama administration to provide temporary protections to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children. As a researcher, I encountered participants who were concerned for their students and eager for their voices — and the voices of their students — to be heard.

Dannette’s journey

When I (Dannette Gomez Beane) chose my dissertation topic, “Virginia Counselors’ Engagement With Social Issues Advocacy for Black/African American Clients/Students” in spring 2017, I never could have predicted what would occur that fall. During the time that I was engaged in my data collection, the white supremacist rallies that ended in violence and death in Charlottesville, Virginia, transpired. The topic of race relations was suddenly on everyone’s mind, but especially mine as my dissertation clock ticked.

I had difficulty telling people about my research. People didn’t understand why we were always talking about race. People found it even more bizarre that, as a Latina, I had chosen a topic that concerned African Americans. My reasons for picking the topic had everything to do with the revolving door of students in my office who could not attend class, turn in assignments or even talk to their friends because they felt so debilitated from what was going on around them. I just kept thinking, “What can I do to help? What are counselors in my state doing to help these students?”

Responses and critical incidents

We (Shekila and Dannette) processed our own personal reactions to these events. The issues that arose during the writing of our dissertations served as motivation to complete our research. Although both of us feared the worst, we hoped for the best as our research progressed. Our fear was that what was occurring nationally and regionally would silence the participation of counselors, causing them to retreat to neutrality out of a concern of responding in a socially undesirable way. Our hope was that counselors would rise to the occasion and speak on behalf of those marginalized populations that needed advocacy. Ultimately, both of us were successful in our data collection, and the respondents to our studies commented with expressions of concern for themselves and their clients/students.

One counselor who responded to Dannette’s study said, “I work in a rural county in the South and have about 20 percent of my population that is African American. I also work in a system very close to Charlottesville. We always have race issues.”

A participant in Shekila’s study shared the frustrations of their students. The participant recalled a time when one of their students wore a T-shirt that said “Relax Trump, I’m Legal.” Another participant who was a DACA recipient was concerned that he might no longer be able to work with his students if DACA were repealed.

The “critical incident” experienced by the advocate begins a process of cognitive dissonance, a “waking up.” According to Leon Festinger’s theory, when individuals experience cognitive dissonance, it changes the core of what they believe, leading them to wrestle with new information in light of things they have previously understood (for more, see Paul C. Gorski’s article “Cognitive dissonance as a strategy in social justice training” in the Fall 2009 issue of Multicultural Education). Thus, advocates begin to recognize the shift within themselves as it relates to a social issue.

Encountering an undocumented student as a high school counselor served as my (Shekila’s) critical incident. In that moment, I felt helpless and uninformed, but through that critical incident, I began my research, which later propelled me to a place of advocacy.

One of my research participants made a statement about how activist counselors develop: “I think that over time, because of my being sensitive to some of their [undocumented students’] struggles and just seeing the human side to their stories … there’s stuff that you don’t learn being in the counseling program. It’s like baptism by fire with that. It’s not something that I can teach. You can’t teach people to be empathetic like that. You can certainly tell them this is how you go about it, but you either have that or you don’t have that. You may be able to awaken something in someone with it, but if it’s not there, it’s not there.”

Dannette’s research is informed by racial identity development theory, with “encounter” being a stage in which a person is faced with the realization that race matters. Counselors who experience these “critical” or “encounter” moments are undeterred from participating with and advocating for others. On the other hand, counselors who have not experienced such a profound incident may not be as moved to engage in social issues advocacy.

As one of Dannette’s study respondents shared, “During an incident that occurred last year at my school when a black/African American student was suspended, I was told by my admin to stay out of it. I felt strongly that the way it was handled was discrimination, and [I] was very disturbed. I was able to discuss the incident with the parent in private and give [her] tools to help advocate for her son. She was also upset because of the way it was managed. I was not able to get into it too deeply with the parent because I felt my job was in jeopardy. However, I was able to encourage her to take it further and add insight into the best way to do so.”

The adversity we face in our work, school and personal lives for participating in social issues advocacy is heightened when incidents occur that feed the political divisiveness. The emotional toil that advocating takes on the activist counselor can be daunting. The work is ever-changing and never-ending. The activist counselor strives to always be informed and to inform others. The greater the degree of political divisiveness, the more strain it can take on the activist counselor. Compassion fatigue can set in, which brings us to self-care.

Avoid, engage, deflect

How can we seek and find comfort, understanding and care when we make our living and have developed our identities as activist counselors? Speaking as the authors of this article, we rely on peer support, faculty advisers, family members, friends and faith communities. At times, however, these normal sources of support and encouragement do not align with the activist mentality; in fact, they sometimes choose to remain neutral or even work against the advocacy. In such cases, activist counselors are left to do one of the following: avoid, engage or deflect.

Note: We (the authors) avoid going to social media for support because we find that causes another layer of stress that will not be addressed in this article.

Avoidance

Our identity as activist counselors is hard to shut off. Some would argue that it never shuts off. Avoiding times when our “buttons are pushed” is a skill that takes practice. The benefit to avoiding adversarial opinions is that of self-preservation. We sometimes “pick our battles” when engaging in dialogue and try to focus on the outcome of peace if avoidance is the best decision. The risk is that we miss a teachable moment or fail to use our place of privilege to educate others.

Engagement

As activist counselors, we are good at compartmentalizing our needs and views for the well-being of others, but when it comes to standing up for what we believe in outside of the therapeutic relationship, we typically take the opportunity to engage.

We often encourage our clients to engage with conflict because it is a practice that almost always results in growth and stretching. Engaging with conflict is natural for counselors who help others to face their fears, practice change and reframe ideologies. The benefit of engaging with adversarial views is that dialogue can emerge, allowing opportunities to increase understanding of and empathy for the other’s view. The risk of this engagement is that the dialogue might turn into an argument, with one-sided views and the shutting down of a topic or, worse, a relationship. As counselors, we are trained to de-escalate these types of heated situations, finding ways to redirect or, in some instances, deflect.

Deflection

Here it comes. You have no time to avoid or engage. A person in your life just dropped a statement that goes against your activist counselor mindset and identity. You know what this sounds like. It is a statement such as “I don’t see _____. All people are the same in my eyes” or “Those people need to ______.” You are left to react without warning.

One approach, especially when caught off guard, is to deflect. The risk in deflecting is that we may seem like we are not paying attention to what the person is saying because we choose to change the topic. This could cause suspicion or hurt if the person is hoping for our engagement in this topic. The benefit is that we do not engage in what could be a relationship-ending conversation depending on the situation.

Recharging the activist self

Avoidance, engagement and deflection are just three examples of ways to approach our daily walk as activist counselors. Counselors regularly encounter situations that must be navigated carefully, and there is no judgment in using any of these three approaches.

As activist counselors, we are hard-wired to serve. But we cannot continue to serve well unless we are diligent in practicing self-care. In this context, self-care does not mean going to the local spa (although we all need that kind of treatment every once in a while). Self-care means filling our cups back up when we are feeling low. Here are some strategies that we have found helpful in recharging our activist selves.

1) Reflect often: We must ask ourselves, why do we do what we do? Reflection is a key component to self-actualization and bringing meaning to our work. Through reflection, we can be in a constant state of improvement. We become more aware, become more open-minded, more readily recognize our own biases and work toward personal growth and change. Reflection enables counselors to grow in both empathy and connection to others.

2) Remain informed: Activist counselors must stay informed of real stories and real facts so they can remain rooted in the truths of people’s experiences rather than getting caught up in the media spin. Counselors must also stay up-to-date with evolving issues as they become more complex. It is imperative for counselors to see events from all angles and to seek out the voices that have been silenced.

3) Give voice to the voiceless: That brings us to using our power for good. As counselors, we hold a position of authority with the clients and students we serve. In addition, our education provides us with privilege that can be used to give voice to those who have been silenced, including individuals who are struggling to enjoy basic freedoms in this country. Our voices are needed. Our voices should be heard.

As counselors, we are always to remember beneficence — to do good and to promote the well-being of others. This is our strength in the counseling relationship. As activist counselors, we must also recognize when rest is needed and when we need to ask for help. Remember that we advocate together to eradicate the systemic oppression that impacts our clients and our students — and even us — every day.

Together, we are change agents. The foundation of what we do and why we do it can be summed up in a quote from Mohandas Gandhi: “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.”

 

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Shekila Melchior is an assistant professor and program coordinator of school counseling at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Contact her at shekila-melchior@utc.edu.

Dannette Gomez Beane is the director of recruitment and operations of undergraduate admissions at Virginia Tech. She adjunct teaches for the counselor education programs at Virginia Tech and Buena Vista University. Contact her at gomezds@vt.edu.

Letters to the editor: ct@counseling.org

Counseling Today reviews unsolicited articles written by American Counseling Association members. To access writing guidelines and tips for having an article accepted for publication, go to ct.counseling.org/feedback.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

A favorite, yet bittersweet, month

Richard Yep June 1, 2018

Richard Yep, ACA CEO

June is one of my favorite months. Winter coats and gloves are stashed away, the pollen has usually come and gone, many of us are close to taking a vacation, and the fruits and vegetables at the farmers markets taste much better. What’s not to love about June? Well, here at the American Counseling Association, June is proverbially bittersweet for us because we must bid farewell to a number of outstanding volunteers and leaders whose terms conclude at the end of the month.

President Gerard Lawson led our association and the counseling profession this year. He came into office with several objectives and worked successfully with other outstanding leaders on the ACA Governing Council, as well as with region officers, division and branch presidents, and many dedicated volunteers, to accomplish a number of tasks. Our committees and task forces were kept busy carrying out the charges they were assigned. Looking back over the past 12 months, a great deal has been accomplished. To all of you who served in a volunteer role, I want to thank you for your efforts, your dedication and your work in advancing the counseling profession.

In thinking back to the ACA 2018 Conference & Expo held in Atlanta at the end of April, I was so impressed to note that more than 500 first-timers attended the event. Many of these first-timers were graduate students and new professionals with five or fewer years of experience. In addition, during the past year, our student membership surged beyond 20,000 individuals, which I see as a very good sign for both the association and the counseling profession. One of our goals at ACA is to continue meeting the needs of this new cadre of professional counselors regardless of practice setting.

At the same time, we want to make sure that we pay homage to those professional counselors and counselor educators who helped build our association, which began in 1952. At the ACA Conference in Atlanta, our 66th president, Gerard Lawson, asked those attending the opening keynote session to observe a moment of silence in memory of Robert Shaffer, who served as the first president of ACA (then known as the American Personnel and Guidance Association). Bob passed away in 2017 at the age of 101. During that moment of silence, I was reminded of the continuum we are on as an organization.

I wonder whether Bob Shaffer and his contemporaries ever envisioned how the profession and ACA would grow in the ensuing years. In fact, I wonder whether we can envision what ACA and the counseling profession will look like in another 66 years. What I do know is that members of the ACA Governing Council did an incredible amount of work on the new strategic plan that they adopted this spring. Many hours of effort went into this project, which will allow ACA to look at issues strategically and align our resources to successfully reach our goals.

We live in a consequential time in our history. Professional counselors have been instrumental at other consequential times. This suggests to me that during this period, you will be needed more than ever. I commend all of you who identify as counselors or counselor educators, and I express my appreciation for the work you do. And for those who have made the commitment to volunteer and serve in leadership for counseling organizations at the local, state, regional or national level, please know that you are valued and appreciated.

As always, I look forward to your comments, questions and thoughts. Feel free to call me at 800-347-6647 ext. 231 or email me at ryep@counseling.org. You can also follow me on Twitter: @Richyep.

Be well.

From the President: Reflection and erratum

Gerard Lawson

Gerard Lawson, ACA’s 66th president

This last column for Counseling Today is a little bittersweet. This past year, as I have had the privilege of serving as American Counseling Association president, I have written these articles on planes and trains, in airports and in hotel rooms. (I even managed to write one or two at home or in my office.) That travel has allowed me to see more of the incredible work that counselors do and to hear more about how this profession is growing and changing to meet the needs of people in our communities. I have come away with an even deeper appreciation of the work that you do.

I won’t go through a year in review, detailing everything that ACA has done over the past year, but there are some highlights that I’d like to share. This spring, we saw the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) become an entity entirely separate from ACA. Although we will continue to seek opportunities to partner with ASCA, this also allows ACA to speak clearly to the value that school counselors bring as highly qualified mental health professionals working in school settings. These days, we are seeing so much trauma, self-injury, depression, anxiety, suicidal behaviors and the like. School counselors are often the first mental health professionals to recognize these issues and sometimes the last line of defense before a child falls through the cracks. ACA is working diligently to support school counselors as they serve the mental health needs of students.

Sadly, over the past year, we have repeatedly seen the need for highly trained counselors to respond after disasters in our communities. There were natural disasters such as those that impacted the Gulf Coast region and Puerto Rico, where millions of people were displaced, being left to clean up and start over again once the storms had passed. Those in Puerto Rico are still struggling to recover. Following mass shootings in Las Vegas; Sutherland Springs, Texas; Parkland, Florida; and elsewhere, counselors were called on to help people make sense of a world that suddenly seemed more dangerous and unpredictable. ACA members responded to each of these incidents, providing disaster mental health services and supporting affected individuals and communities.

This year the ACA Governing Council also undertook a significant project to revise ACA’s strategic plan. Through the entire process, our focus has been on how best to position ACA to provide opportunities and support for counselors to do what they do best — help people overcome life’s challenges, help people build on their strengths and resilience, and walk side by side with people in need. Every year, leaders across this profession are given the opportunity to build on the foundation left by our predecessors. During our terms, we correct the course, achieve what we can and leave a solid foundation for the next generation of leaders. I am incredibly proud of the work that was done by our task forces and committees, the Governing Council and the professional staff at ACA, and I am honored to have had an opportunity to serve as president of this incredible organization. We are better together, and the world is a better place because of the work you do.

Before signing off, I will acknowledge one significant error. I began the first Counseling Today column of my term reflecting on a line from a James Taylor song that goes, “Ten miles behind me, 10,000 more to go …” Traveling to meet with members in our branches and divisions is among the highlights of an ACA president’s responsibilities, but it can be a bit exhausting. According to airline records, I actually traveled 45,203 miles during my term as president. I wouldn’t trade a single one of those miles, because they led me to rediscover the real strength of our association. You.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve.