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For such a time as this: Plan of action for young adults, adolescents and parents

By Esther Scott June 22, 2020

[Editor’s note: This is the third of four articles in a series on action plans for different areas of life during the COVID-19 pandemic.]

To young adults, the risk of contracting the coronavirus or suffering a negative outcome may feel remote. Research studies show that when young people talk about risk reduction, they tend to be referring to reducing social or reputational risks. As a young adult, you may be in the same boat. While the individual risks of COVID-19 may seem low for young people, it is worth stating that becoming infectious could worsen the health and financial security of your community and make it much harder for you to find work, especially if you are just graduating.

Remembering that your youth and health give you “superhero” powers will help you take a more active role in this crisis to protect yourself and those you love. As the line from the Spider-Man comics and movies reminds us, “With great power comes great responsibility.” You have the power of good health, and it is your responsibility to help solve the problem by protecting yourself and others.

Here is a plan of action for young adults, adolescents and their parents.

 

1) Obtain reliable information.

A deep understanding of how people view risk is crucial to stopping the spread of disease. Gathering a similar understanding of COVID-19 can help young people to participate willingly instead of resenting authority. It is important that you see breaking physical distancing guidelines as being risky not only for yourself and those you love, but risky for your entire community.

The same is true when it comes to understanding your economic risks. Analysts believe that young workers and new grads may be hit harder because they tend to work in the food, retail and hospitality industries — places that are experiencing harsher impacts as consumers stay home more. Obtaining reliable information will help you navigate the expected upcoming changes.

2) Control peer pressure. Prioritize safety over reputation.

One obvious reason for the prioritization of social reputation over health risk is peer pressure and the need to fit in socially. In the wake of COVID-19, there were numerous stories in the media highlighting young people who continued to gather despite social distancing guidelines. There were also reports of young adults violating shelter-in-place and social distancing orders to meet lovers and potential hookups because they felt pressured by friends to do so.

One way to evade social pressure is to plan your response ahead of time. Hosting remote meetings and parties could be one such response. With the rise of social media, distant hangouts are trending.

 

Plan of action for students and adolescents

In this difficult situation, it is best to look at the positive side: We have unbelievably valuable time to spend at home. This unprecedented situation that we are experiencing affects everyone. Adolescents too can learn to manage what they can control so that they emerge from this stronger. We can use this crisis to help them grow as resilient, autonomous human beings. Here is plan of action that can help students and adolescents make the most of this situation.

1) Keep a structured routine — a time for everything.

It is particularly important to keep a predictable routine. Develop a schedule that includes activities such as family sports, reading books, and collaborating with the rest of the family. It is important that students, especially teenagers, spend time in productive physical activities. Go out and throw the ball, shoot some baskets, go for a walk around the block or simply do some jumping jacks.

2) Continue education by reading and writing.

Two other important activities for students and adolescents during this crisis are reading books and writing thoughts. This time at home is the perfect opportunity to dedicate yourself to reading books and stories that have been on the shelf for a while. If possible, we recommend reading together as a family, including reflecting on the content of the story or answering questions that come up after reading it.

Writing thoughts or a diary with the events of the day or a gratitude journal about things you enjoy will continue to help you put these circumstances in perspective. If you graduated from high school or college this year, consider staying in school to pursue the next level of education. It could help you land a higher-paying job in the future.

3) Get involved.

Participating in household chores and taking responsibility for “their things” (their room, their clothes, etc.) is especially motivating for older children and adolescents. Allowing them to collaborate in the kitchen by researching new recipes or cooking (especially when personal assistants such as Google Assistant and Alexa are available for recipes) can also help develop growth and autonomy.

There are various ways that students and adolescents can take their place in this moment in history and make this time more enjoyable. They can write letters to the older adults in their families or communities and show appreciation for health personnel by sending prayers to them and those who are sick. It is good for young people to develop a sense of belonging in their communities and to know that their actions make a difference.

 

Plan of action for parents

Sticking to a routine is essential to keep your sanity (just as it is for your children). Maintaining a schedule can be helpful in creating a bit of normalcy in this unexpected situation and in reducing your anxiety level because your brain will feel in control.

Be a team. Keep it balanced. If you have a partner, try alternating who is looking after the kids or making meals. But most importantly, communicate your needs to your team. Remember that flexibility is key in times of crisis. Be kind to yourself; you are doing the best you can.

Although we have yet to see the full extent of the economic slowdown induced by COVID-19, analysts currently expect that we will recover once the virus is under control. So, hold on.

 

 

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Esther Scott, LPC

Esther Scott is a licensed professional counselor in Arlington, Texas. She is a solution-focused therapist. Her specialties include grief, depression, teaching coping skills and couples counseling. Contact her through her website at positiveactionsinternational.com.

 

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

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