Tag Archives: Coronavirus

CEO’s message: This is your month — celebrate and enjoy

Richard Yep April 3, 2020

Richard Yep, ACA CEO

Each year, it seems like my April column serves as a reminder that  this is Counseling Awareness Month — a recognition that we came up with many, many years ago. I felt there were so many stories to tell, so much to be proud of and so many activities to conduct that a single “counseling awareness week” just would not do. So, we have a full month instead, and even that seems too short at times.

Counseling Awareness Month is designed to increase understanding of the wonderful work that all of you do, day in and day out. As some have heard me say, counselors are great advocates for their clients and students, but not always for themselves. I hope Counseling Awareness Month will be a time when you let others know about one of the world’s greatest professions.

Because we know your time is limited, ACA has this year provided more information on our website to help you celebrate this special month. In addition, we have expanded our event by partnering with key organizations to amplify public attention on counseling and the role of professional counselors. I’m asking you to reach out to organizations with which you are connected to let them know that we would be honored to have them engage in the celebration of Counseling Awareness Month. Our “ask” of our partners is as follows:

I hope all of you will participate in our social media challenges, which will include a photo contest and our #BurnBrightNotOut contest. Another component of our monthlong event will take place Friday, April 10, when we ask people to wear the color teal in a show of solidarity for professional counseling.

We are pushing to make this the best Counseling Awareness Month ever. My hope is that we can count on you to help us increase awareness of the important work that all of you do.
This is a great opportunity to let our various communities know about professional counseling.

I believe Counseling Awareness Month could also be “Counselor Appreciation Month” because that is what I feel about all of you. I hope you will “celebrate yourselves” by recognizing each other in some special way. Please know that your efforts are appreciated and that your work (although grueling at times) really does make the world a better place.

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Finally, I want to recognize so many of you for the work you are doing with clients and students regarding concern over the new coronavirus (COVID-19). I know this epidemic has caused a great deal of anxiety and stress. I also know that we must do all we can to protect ourselves. I encourage you to follow the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as those from the World Health Organization. ACA has information about COVID-19 on our website too.

As always, I look forward to your comments, questions and thoughts. Feel free to call me at 800-347-6647 ext. 231 or to email me at ryep@counseling.org. You can also follow me on Twitter: @Richyep.

Be well.

 

@TechCounselor: Managing the culture of breaking news

By Adria Dunbar March 23, 2020

In the very beginning, social media sites, such as Facebook and Instagram, were more about connecting with people you know in real life or updating your profile to reflect the ways in which you hoped others would see you. The addition of the Facebook newsfeed (and its Instagram equivalent), however, changed everything.

The definition of news is “newly received or noteworthy information, especially about recent or important events.” I don’t know about you, but in my experience it has become harder to filter that which is noteworthy and important from that which is not. My newsfeeds are filled with everything from sponsored advertisements to photos of random acquaintances’ travel adventures. Mixed in, there are local events that I’m interested in attending, close friends’ and family’s announcements of major life events, and comments addressed to me. The problem is a newsfeed treats each of these pieces of information with the same attention. It’s all breaking news, and we receive it as such, and this has an impact.

Breaking news! Someone I haven’t spoken to in 20 years made pancakes for breakfast.

Breaking news! A close friend is in need of help finding a counselor for her daughter.

Breaking news! A piece of legislation that impacts counselors and other mental health professionals has been introduced and needs counselor support.

How do we, as counselors, regain control of our newsfeeds? How do we help clients do the same? The first step is reflecting on the impact of this breaking news culture on your personal and professional life. Consider the following:

  • How much time do you spend filtering through your newsfeed? Is this an amount you feel comfortable with?
  • After reading your newsfeed, how do you feel? Happy? Productive? Or distracted and stressed?
  • In what ways do you find yourself mindlessly or mindfully interacting with your newsfeeds?
  • How do you access your newsfeed? Does the context affect your behavior? For example, I do not have the Facebook mobile app on my iPhone. I only check my newsfeed from my laptop to ensure that I am not filling random 5-15 minute downtime intervals with mindless scrolling.
  • Think about the timing of when you ingest breaking news. For example, checking a newsfeed first thing in the morning can set the tone for your day or decide how you direct your morning energy and attention.

The next step is to make changes that help you manage breaking news, such as:

  • Consider removing apps with newsfeeds from your mobile device.
  • Hide your newsfeed completely from the desktop version of social media sites.
  • Eliminate—or hide– people, pages or accounts that are not having a positive impact (both Twitter and Facebook allow you to “mute” rather than unfriend or unfollow).
  • Narrow your follow or friend list to 25-50 people and pages that are most meaningful to you.
  • Turn off notifications to avoid constant distraction

Technology, while helpful in many ways, has created a daily existence that calls for our attention to be pulled in many different directions at once. This can leave us, and our clients, feeling distracted, scattered, and stressed. By intentionally filtering our newsfeeds to better match our values, we can stop the relentless breaking news from breaking through so only that which is most important gains our attention.

Now, more than ever, it is imperative that we take care of ourselves when filtering information through social media and traditional media outlets. Let’s all please take care of ourselves so that we can continue to do the work of taking care of others. It’s OK to set boundaries, create buffers, and take breaks.

 

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Adria S. Dunbar is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She has more than 15 years of experience with both efficient and inefficient technology in school settings, private practice and counselor education. Contact her at adria.dunbar@ncsu.edu.

@TechCounselor’s Instagram is @techcounselor.

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

The Counseling Connoisseur: How to talk to children about the coronavirus

By Cheryl Fisher March 17, 2020

The novel coronavirus, which causes the respiratory disease COVID-19, has made headlines for several weeks and has drastically impacted life as we know it. The outbreak, which the World Health Organization recently labeled a pandemic, has disrupted global commerce, shaken the United States stock market and led to travel restrictions and international border closures. Here in the United States, in an attempt to slow the coronavirus spread, major events have been canceled, educational systems are resorting to online forums, and organizations are recommending that employees telecommute. Medical providers are offering telehealth services, and places of worship are examining alternatives to in-person worship services. As of March 13, President Trump declared a national emergency, which may bring additional restrictions.

The coronavirus and children’s mental health

Global anxiety is high, and our clients are negatively impacted as they stockpile supplies and prepare for the unknown. Meanwhile, in the midst of the chaos, children struggle to make sense of all that they are seeing and hearing. Overwhelmed with information, children are responding in a variety of ways. Professionals who work with children report an increase in insomnia, rumination, intrusive thoughts, nightmares, and acting out behaviors.

“After twenty years of successful classroom management, I am finding it hard to command the attention of kids whose energy is so amped up,” says Steff Linden, an educator and children’s mindfulness yoga instructor in Annapolis, Maryland. “They are running around, tripping over themselves, and bumping into each other. These behaviors are examples of children who are overstimulated. They know something is going on, but they don’t know how to react, and they feel helpless and stuck.”

Children can’t escape the tension created by the viral crisis, so they begin creating an understanding which is often complicated by misinformation. “I had a kid poke his finger in my arm and yell, ‘You’ve got the coronavirus! I touched you!’” Linden reports.

Children are acting out their fears through behavior and play. Therefore, it is vital to address their concerns in a way that is reassuring and honest. Here are some tips for talking to children about the coronavirus: The acronym CAPES.

C: Create a calm setting. Children pick up on the emotions of the adults around them. Adults need to manage their anxiety before attempting to address the concerns of children. It is essential to provide a calm setting before talking with children about COVID-19.

A: Ask what they already know. Children are already talking about the virus. They may have misinformation that needs to be corrected. Ask children what they have heard about the virus? Ask them about their concerns and fears. Children tend to worry about their own safety and those in their immediate world such as friends, family members, and even pets.

P: Provide age-appropriate answers. Answer children’s questions with honest, factual and age appropriate answers. Provide answers that are bias-free. Explain that COVID-19 is caused by a new virus and makes people feel sick with a cough and fever. Help battle stigmatizing any particular population by emphasizing that the coronavirus is no one person or country’s fault.

E: Empower them with tools. Children feel powerless over this big virus that has people buying out toilet paper and Clorox wipes. Provide them with actual tools to use that will be empowering by teaching them to wash their hands using soap and water while singing a happy tune for twenty seconds, cough or sneeze into their elbows—not their hands—or a tissue that they immediately toss in the trash and use no contact greetings such as jazz hands or Namaste.

S: Safety. Children turn to adults for a sense of safety and well-being. Assure children that it is not their job to worry about the virus and that you have a plan in place to care for them. Explain ways that you are keeping them safe by making sure they get enough sleep and providing them with nutritious meals. Tell them that their regular visits to the pediatrician and daily vitamin (if they take one) help keep them healthy. Even with school closings, provide daily structure that includes time for non-directed play to help children act out and process feelings. Help them make a list of ways they are healthy and safe. There are a lot of unknowns with COVID 19, so focus your conversation on what is known.

 

As counselors, we can help parents and our child clients better manage the plethora of information that is available. We can assure children that the adults in their lives are up for the task of taking care of them. The acronym CAPES can remind us how to be superheroes in an effective way to the young members of society who are powerless.

And, as always, we must remember our own self-care during this challenging time. Take a peek at my thoughts around a counselor’s guide to surviving flu season my column from February 2018, “The Counseling Connoisseur: Compassion and self-care during flu season.”

 

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Important links:

COVID-19 update and resources from Counseling Today

COVID-19 related resources from the American Counseling Association

 

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Cheryl Fisher

Cheryl Fisher is a licensed clinical professional counselor in private practice in Annapolis, Maryland. She is director and assistant professor for Alliant International University California School of Professional Psychology’s online MA in Clinical Counseling.  Her research interests include examining sexuality and spirituality in young women with advanced breast cancer; nature-informed therapy; and geek therapy. She may be contacted at cyfisherphd@gmail.com.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

COVID-19 update and resources

March 16, 2020

The American Counseling Association is working to keep its members and the public informed as the new coronavirus, COVID-19, becomes an increasing reality and issue of concern across the United States. Updates will be posted at the ACA website, counseling.org.

 

Relevant resources and information:

  • If you are overwhelmed or in crisis, the Disaster Distress Helpline offers 24-7 support. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

 

Related reading, from the Counseling Today archives:

Living with anxiety”

The mental health effects of sheltering-in-place

Lending a helping hand in disaster’s wake

The Counseling Connoisseur: Compassion and self-care during flu season

Stumbling blocks to counselor self-care

“Grieving everyday losses”

“The (misguided) pursuit of happiness”

Virtual school counseling brings unique rewards and challenges

“Apps4Counseling: What’s in your digital toolbox?

Learning to love (or at least leverage) technology

Technology Tutor: Ethical and legal considerations of counseling tech

Technology Tutor: Are you prepared for the unexpected?

Making it safe to talk about suicidal ideation

Addressing intimate partner violence with clients