Tag Archives: Mental Health

Maldistribution: Mental health care in America

By Bethany Bray October 14, 2019

Access to mental health care varies greatly depending on where one lives in the United States. This variance is so great that Mental Health America (MHA) referred to the situation as a “maldistribution” of behavioral health providers in a recent report.

In Massachusetts, there is a mental health provider for every 180 residents, which marks the best ratio in the nation. On the other end of the spectrum is Alabama, which has the nation’s worst ratio at 1,100 residents for every one mental health provider. Texas, West Virginia, Georgia, Arizona, Tennessee, Mississippi and Iowa are the others states that have ratios of 700:1 or worse.

MHA, a Virginia-based nonprofit advocacy organization, compiles a report of mental health indicators each year from nationwide survey data, including information from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In tabulating its ratios, MHA included counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, and nurses specializing in mental health care in its definition of mental health provider.

MHA’s report, The State of Mental Health in America, was released in September.

When weighing access to mental health care and insurance against prevalence of mental illness, substance abuse, suicidal ideation and other factors, MHA ranked Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, Rhode Island and Maryland as the top five states (in that order) for mental health in its most recent report. Nevada was ranked last in MHA’s list, preceded by Oregon, Idaho, Utah and Wyoming.

The organization also recognized Rhode Island as rising from 27th to fourth in its overall rankings over the past six years. In contrast, Alaska has gone from 17th to 46th, Kansas from 18th to 42nd, and North Carolina from 16th to 35th during that same time period.

MHA tracks a number of other mental health indicators in its annual report, including statistics on youth and adults with substance use disorders, depression and suicide, as well as insurance coverage and rates of treatment and other data. MHA notes that rates of overall mental illness (defined as “having a diagnosable mental, behavioral or emotional disorder, other than a developmental or substance use disorder”) among American adults have remained relatively stagnant, increasing from 18.19% to 18.57% between 2012 and 2017. However, suicidal ideation among adults rose from 3.77% to 4.19% over those six years.

Of note is a more than 4% increase in prevalence of past-year major depressive episodes in youth ages 12 to 17 (an increase of 8.66% to 13.01% from 2012 to 2017).

“While ensuring that youth with mental health conditions have greater access to care is vitally important, the only way to address the rising prevalence of mental health conditions in youth is to address the upstream causes on a population level,” wrote MHA. “States must invest time and resources into researching and understanding the causes for this drastic worsening of mental health in youth ages 12-17 and generating meaningful and effective policies and programs to address mental health concerns before they reach the point of becoming a diagnosable mental health condition.”

 

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Mental Health America’s The State of Mental Health in America 2020

When it comes to mental health, how does your state stack up?

View the full report and state rankings at mhanational.org

State-by-state ranking of adult mental health factors (page 16 of MHA’s report; mhanational.org)

 

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CT Online’s recap of MHA’s 2019 report: “America’s mental health disparities

 

 

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Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

 

Finding strength in sensitivity

By Lindsey Phillips September 24, 2019

When Louisa Lombard, a licensed professional clinical counselor in private practice in California, worked as a school counselor, parents would sometimes come to her saying, “My child is so sensitive. I don’t know why he’s like this. Everything is such a big deal. I parent my children the same way. Why is he like this? His brother’s doing great in school and not throwing tantrums and crying. What’s wrong with this kid?”

In actuality, nothing was “wrong” with the child. What the parents didn’t know was that their child had an innate temperament trait referred to as sensory processing sensitivity. Approximately 20% of the population has this sensitivity trait and is categorized as a “highly sensitive person.” Narrow that focus to the therapeutic world, and closer to 50% of psychotherapy clients possess this trait, according to Elaine Aron, a pioneer in the field of sensitivity, in Psychotherapy and the Highly Sensitive Person.

People with this trait often look carefully before entering new situations or retreat from overwhelming ones. For this reason, they are sometimes mislabeled as being shy, when in fact, an estimated 30% of highly sensitive people are extraverted.

Because no one person’s experience is the same, Aron identified four basic characteristics of the highly sensitive person (also known as the DOES model):

  • Depth of processing
  • Overstimulation
  • Emotional responsiveness and empathy
  • Sensitivity to subtleties

Aron points out that the sensory processing sensitivity trait is a survival advantage in some situations because it allows individuals to process information more thoroughly and increases their responsiveness to the environment and social stimuli.

So, why do highly sensitive people — who have this survival advantage — make up roughly 50% of therapy clients? Julie Bjelland, a licensed psychotherapist in private practice in California, thinks the number is so high because highly sensitive people are a) more responsive to therapeutic work and self-help and b) more likely to have higher levels of stress, anxiety and depression.

Heather Smith, an assistant professor of human development counseling at Vanderbilt University, posits that because these individuals process deeply, they are more inclined to seek out answers and are drawn to counseling for its penetrating conversations. In addition, she says, these clients may have developed low self-esteem because of negative stereotypes about sensitivity, or they might want tools to help them navigate times when they feel more emotional intensity.   

Misdiagnosing a trait for a disorder

According to Erica Sawyer, an American Counseling Association member in private practice in Vancouver, Washington, misdiagnosis of the highly sensitive person often occurs because people aren’t aware that the trait exists or of the trait’s specific characteristics. The scientific name for the trait — sensory processing sensitivity — doesn’t help. The similarity in name between sensory processing sensitivity and sensory processing disorder often leads to confusion. But sensory processing sensitivity is a temperament trait, not a disorder. (Aron notes on The Highly Sensitive Person website, hsperson.com, that sensory processing disorder, on the other hand, is a neurological disorder involving the senses.)

As Lombard points out, most therapists receive limited training on temperaments. She first learned about sensory processing sensitivity after graduate school when her oldest daughter started showing signs of the trait, including being sensitive to noise, facial expressions and food. As Lombard learned more, she realized that she is also highly sensitive. She had long suspected that she had attention-deficit disorder because she had a hard time paying attention in her college classes if another student was kicking a desk in a rhythmic pattern behind her or if there was a bright light overhead in the room.

In fact, because highly sensitive people can get overwhelmed and overstimulated more easily when a lot is going on around them, they can commonly be misdiagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Bjelland says. However, whereas a highly sensitive person is typically able to concentrate in the right environment — when at home in a quiet room, for example — someone with ADHD might not be, she explains.

One confusing aspect to the highly sensitive temperament is that it doesn’t necessarily produce problems in daily life other than overstimulation, says Smith, a licensed professional counselor and an ACA member. Thus, when clinicians hear about a client’s distress due to overstimulation, they can erroneously attribute it to symptoms of a disorder, she explains. To help prevent this, Smith recommends that counselors investigate whether a client’s issue (such as anxiety, stress or an inability to concentrate) decreases if he or she is no longer in an overstimulating environment. If the client’s issue is still present, then it might be a symptom of a disorder.

Smith also points out that counselors often rely on observable behaviors to indicate a possible symptom or disorder. However, depth of processing is not easily observable, she notes. To help counselors learn to identify this characteristic, Smith describes some cues: Highly sensitive people think more about the meaning of life. If in an environment where they are not overstimulated and their ideas are valued, they have the ability to describe all facets of a problem and generate potential prevention steps or solutions — often before others realize there is a problem. They are observers, not the ones to jump into action. They often don’t make decisions quickly. When they speak, it seems as though they have grasped the insight or concept quickly, in large part because they have been thinking about all of these connections for most of their lives.

One tool that can help counselors assess for sensory processing sensitivity is Aron’s 27-item self-test (see hsperson.com/test/highly-sensitive-test). Smith, Julie Sriken and Bradley Erford analyzed the strength of this scale and found it to be a valid screening instrument that counselors can use in their practices (see “Clinical and Research Utility of the Highly Sensitive Person Scale” published in the Journal of Mental Health Counseling.) Smith presented on this topic at the ACA 2019 Conference.

However, to avoid labeling, Smith cautions counselors against placing too great an emphasis on the cutoff score of this self-test. Instead, she recommends having a conversation about how the client marked each item on the scale. This approach focuses less on the total score and more on the person’s experience overall and with each item.

Smith also advises counselors to be careful about interpreting the results from these test items or problem-solving a client’s distress too early on the basis of these initial conversations. In addition to risking misdiagnosis, counselors run the risk of not being seen as credible by clients who have been deeply thinking about issues related to this trait for a while, she says.

Wired differently

Misunderstandings about the sensory processing sensitivity trait also occur when it is assumed that this population is just sensitive to lights and sounds. It is more than that. The brains of highly sensitive people are wired differently than the brains of other people. A 2018 post on the website Highly Sensitive Refuge notes four differences in the brains of highly sensitive people:

  • Their brains respond to dopamine differently.
  • Their mirror neurons (which allow people to “mirror” the behaviors of others and be more empathetic) are more active.
  • They experience emotions more vividly than others (as enhanced by their ventromedial prefrontal cortex).
  • Their brains are more finely tuned to noticing and interpreting other people.

A recent fMRI study published in Brain and Behavior found that highly sensitive people have increased brain activation in regions related to awareness, action planning, empathy, and self-other processing. Lombard, who specializes in working with teenagers and adults who are highly sensitive, shows clients brain scan images from studies such as this one to illustrate how the highly sensitive brain differs in emotional situations such as watching a scary movie or seeing a picture of a loved one. She finds that these images help normalize the trait for clients.

On a podcast for Unapologetically Sensitive, Esther Bergsma, a counselor in the Netherlands and an expert on high sensitivity, reported that highly sensitive people have more brain activation, especially in the areas surrounding social context (e.g., wondering what others think about them, how others view them, or if others accept them). Bergsma pointed out that always being tuned into social contexts is a strength; it is only when people can’t regulate their emotions well that it leads to increased anxiety and stress.

Because people who are highly sensitive have to process more information and can experience nervous system overload as a result, they can be prone to chronic health conditions if they do not have adequate self-care and downtime, says Bjelland, author of The Empowered Highly Sensitive Person: How to Harness Your Sensitivity Into Strength in a Chaotic World.

She likens the way that highly sensitive people deeply process information to cups of water being dumped into the nervous system (“the container”). Highly sensitive people might have 100 cups that they dump into the container, whereas other people have only a few cups to dump. In other words, these individuals notice and process more detail. For example, a highly sensitive child in a classroom might simultaneously notice that a teacher is upset and the happy expression on a classmate’s face across the room and a tree branch tapping against the classroom window.

One way to simplify these brain differences is to think of the brain as two parts: the emotional brain and the cognitive brain. The emotional part of the brain in highly sensitive people is more activated, and if it becomes too activated, the cognitive part of the brain goes to sleep in a sense, Bjelland says. “That’s why [highly sensitive people] might have a hard time with emotional regulation and can get stuck in worry, rumination, anxiety and overwhelm,” she explains. “During times of high stress, the brain cannot tell the difference between a real threat and a perceived threat, so it sends out alarm bells in the system to prepare for fighting or fleeing. In those moments, [highly sensitive people] can’t even access facts, memory and rational thought because that all comes from [the] cognitive brain.”

However, counselors can teach clients ways to reactivate the cognitive brain to support their system and to let the brain know that it isn’t time to send out those alarms, Bjelland continues. For example, she uses a simple breathing technique to calm the body and let the brain know that the person isn’t in danger. Clients breathe in for four counts, hold for two counts, and exhale for seven; they repeat this for about five to seven breath cycles. “The exhale is very long and slow because that sends a signal to your brain that you are not in danger and that it can stop sending out adrenaline and stress hormones. When you exhale slowly, your brain realizes you are OK because that is not how you breathe when you’re in danger,” she explains.

The counting part (whether done out loud or silently) is important because it helps “wake up” the cognitive part of the brain, she adds.

Reframing the perception of sensitivity

As a highly sensitive person herself, Bjelland grew up hearing the negative messages often directed toward people with the sensory processing sensitivity trait: “Why are you so sensitive? What’s wrong with you? Why are you reacting that way?” When people hear those messages as children, she says, they do begin wondering what is wrong with them.

That internalized message is why psychoeducation about the trait is so important, along with validating clients’ experiences. Most highly sensitive people spend their entire lives feeling misunderstood and that something is different about or wrong with them, Bjelland says. Therapy is the place where these clients can begin changing this narrative and turning it into something empowering, she notes.

In her experience working with this population, Bjelland finds that clients often have a transformative experience once they realize that their temperament is normal, that they are not alone, and that they can take steps to improve their experience.

On the other hand, Smith has noticed that some highly sensitive clients experience a grief response after first learning about the trait. They may need time to grieve that they are unlike the other 80% of the population and yet live in a world designed by those without the sensitivity trait, she observes.

Sawyer, a licensed mental health counselor and art therapist, also helps clients reframe their negative experiences, such as being labeled crybabies as children. Counselors can help clients understand that they feel both negative and positive emotions more intensely than other people do. So, when they cried, they were just naturally expressing what they were sensing, which is normal for someone with this trait, she explains.

“They don’t have the problem,” Sawyer says. “It’s the perception that they have a problem that can turn it into one.” So, rather than thinking that they can’t control their emotions, clients can come to understand that with the right support, they can regulate their emotions. They can also take pride in the fact that they feel not only sadness on a deeper level than most people do but also experience incredible happiness, Sawyer says.

Lombard carefully selected the name of her private practice, Strong and Sensitive, to counter the tendency to equate sensitivity with weakness. Many of her clients come in with low self-esteem because of negative stereotypes about being sensitive. She reassures them that it is a normal temperament variation and not a problem. By normalizing the trait, counselors can help clients to embrace it and see it as a strength rather than a weakness, Lombard adds.

Smith teaches clients to more effectively communicate with those who seem to point out sensitivity as a problem. For instance, rather than taking on the onus to defend their sensitivity, clients could ask the other person, “What part of my sensitivity are you having a problem with?” This question reverses the normal assumption that something is wrong with the client’s sensitivity and shifts the conversation to how the other person may need to adjust his or her language or thinking to help problem-solve the relationship dynamic.

Susceptibility to the environment

Research has shown that in a positive developmental environment, highly sensitive children are more likely to thrive than are their peers who are not highly sensitive. However, in a stressful environment, highly sensitive people tend to do worse than do their peers who are not highly sensitive. In other words, this population is highly susceptible to both the good and bad aspects of their environment — a concept known as differential susceptibility.

A highly sensitive person once told Bjelland that when she was younger, her parents made her wear a wool sweater. After repeatedly asking her parents if she could stop wearing it because the material bothered her, they simply replied, “Wear it anyway.” Bjelland notes that this is an example of a highly sensitive person not being supported, and that circumstance can lead to problems.

Bjelland has also noticed that if a highly sensitive child has anxiety, then almost always one or both parents do too. Therapists can’t easily help anxious children if they have an anxious parent, she says, because the child mirrors the parent and will feel unstable if the parent also feels that way.

Parents who are highly sensitive should also be on counselors’ radar because they can suffer from overstimulation and neglect of self-care, Lombard says. The highly sensitive population is also more negatively affected by sleep deprivation, which is common for parents of young children, Lombard notes. She has noticed that highly sensitive parents are sometimes so focused on being the best parents they can be that they don’t take good care of themselves, pumping breast milk constantly or not making time for meaningful adult conversation, for example.

Lombard and Sawyer both recommend that highly sensitive parents get extra support in the form of family members, friends, daycare or a nanny. If finances are an issue, these parents could consider setting up a rotation with another trusted parent to watch each other’s children on occasion, Lombard says. She also encourages highly sensitive parents to wear earplugs or noise-reducing headphones when appropriate because they turn the noise down a bit and can lessen overstimulation.

Other life changes such as a death in the family, menopause, illness or other stressful events can make highly sensitive people feel unbalanced and overwhelmed, especially if they aren’t taking care of themselves, Bjelland says. If they experience too much emotional activation, they may temporarily lose access to the tools and strategies they normally use to cope with overstimulation, she adds.

To counter this, Bjelland tells clients to keep a “positive journal” to record positive events, such as someone saying something nice to them, or techniques that make them feel good, such as going on a hike in nature. Then, when they are having a bad week, they will have a visual record of self-care tips and positive reminders.

The acceptance of sensitivity within a culture also affects one’s environment. Some clients, but especially men, deny having this temperament because society reinforces the idea that sensitivity is not a positive characteristic, Smith says. (Research suggests that the sensory processing sensitivity trait is equal among men and women.) Thus, counselors should be careful about labeling clients as highly sensitive.

Lombard agrees. In fact, if a client grew up in a machismo culture that considers sensitivity to be negative for men, then she might not directly use the term “highly sensitive person” because it may distract from their treatment or therapeutic progress. “Depending on the culture and family of origin, men can carry more shame around [their heightened] sensitivity,” Lombard says. Instead, she mentions that all people have different temperaments and explains that some situations, such as witnessing a car accident, for example, might affect them differently. She also teaches these clients many of the same coping skills without labeling them as being for highly sensitive people.

Bjelland, who is a global educator on this trait and teaches courses for highly sensitive people, doesn’t see as many self-esteem issues in cultures where sensitivity is more accepted. “In the United States where it’s not so accepted, we see a lot of self-esteem issues. And that’s connected to shame too. Most of us walk around with the narrative that something is wrong with us because that’s what we’ve been told,” she says. “Helping to change the client’s narrative to a positive one, where they recognize why this trait is important to the world, is incredibly important.”

Recently, a male client who identified as highly sensitive came to see Sawyer because he needed a safe space to talk. He was struggling to find and maintain a romantic relationship because he found that women often wanted a stereotypical man — someone bold, assertive and athletic. As they talked, Sawyer discovered that he had internalized the belief that being sensitive was negative, which caused his own social anxieties and made relationships even harder for him. After Sawyer reassured the client that he possessed a normal temperament trait and explained its four main characteristics, he felt less self-judgment.

Although simply providing psychoeducation around the trait can be liberating for some clients, counseling often requires a longer process to help clients begin shifting their negative self-perception of being “weak” or “weird,” she adds.

Mindful changes in an overstimulating world

The good news is that highly sensitive people can makes changes so that their lives are more compatible with this trait and they can more readily cope with the challenges posed by living in an often insensitive and overstimulating world.

Bjelland recommends that highly sensitive people carve out two hours of alone time per day and dedicate one complete day each week to downtime. Not surprisingly, many clients balk at this suggestion, saying they don’t have the available time to do that. Bjelland will ask them to try it for one week and, according to her, they will universally report that they had more energy and were more productive because they were more focused, calm and balanced.

Bjelland also advises clients to follow a slower routine in the morning to help set the tone for the day. Why? Think of the nervous system like a motor, she says. If a highly sensitive person jumps out of bed to get the kids ready for school and then races into work, their nervous system revs up, she explains.

The process of slowing down applies to the bedtime routine as well because, as Bjelland points out, this population often struggles with sleep issues. “If a highly sensitive person wakes up from having a good night’s sleep, they get to have their full 100 points of energy for the day, but if they’re having sleep issues, maybe they’re only going to get 50 points for the day, and they’re already starting out depleted,” she says.

She often tells clients to adopt a ritual of doing the same five things before bed, such as taking a warm bath, reading a nonstimulating book, listening to soft music, meditating, and shutting off all electronics. By the time they reach the third action, the brain realizes sleep is coming, she explains.

“You’re teaching them a new type of self-care because [they’ve] been trying to do what the 80% [of the population that is not highly sensitive] are doing, and it’s not working,” Bjelland adds.

Smith agrees that counselors may need to have conversations centered on how self-care for these clients may differ from what rejuvenates other people. For example, if a highly sensitive person tries to relax by going to a concert with lots of lighting and sound effects after work with friends, he or she may instead feel drained and overstimulated by the end of the night.

Overstimulation is a difficult challenge for people with the sensory processing sensitivity trait because they need so much downtime, Lombard points out. She finds mindfulness techniques helpful for teaching these clients how to stay in the moment and self-regulate. For example, a highly sensitive person may find a coffee shop with loud music and people talking overstimulating. However, counseling can provide the client with strategies to successfully navigate such a space. For instance, perhaps the client limits his or her amount of time in the coffee shop or brings noise-canceling headphones, Lombard suggests.

Because these clients feel so deeply, they often need help learning to calm their nervous systems, Lombard continues. Highly sensitive people “are taking in so much more sensory information, and it’s really overwhelming,” she says. “And sometimes [they’re] not even aware, if [they’re] not mindful, of what it was that made [them] feel down or anxious.” She asks her clients to meditate daily using an app such as Calm or Ten Percent Happier and practice breathing techniques to help them become more mindful, present and calm.

Sawyer also suggests that clients use meditation apps such as Headspace or Insight Timer and practice yoga. Sometimes, even the simple act of closing one’s eyes, listening to nature sounds, or going to a quiet spot such as a bathroom or car can be helpful, she adds. The key is finding activities that “help retrain the brain to slow down [and] pay more attention to what’s happening in [the] body,” she says.

Retraining the brain in this way also helps highly sensitive people realize that they have some control and do not have to feel overwhelmed all the time, Bjelland says. For example, every time clients catch their mind wandering during meditation and bring it back to what they’re focusing on, such as their breath, it is like strengthening a muscle. Then, if clients become overwhelmed at work or a large event, they have trained their brains to notice, and they recognize that they need to take a break, she explains.

To help clients exercise this “muscle,” Bjelland instructs them to ask themselves two questions every time they go to the bathroom: 1) How am I doing? and 2) What do I need? This process makes them aware of preventing depletion or overwhelm, she explains. “Highly sensitive people tend to be very externally focused because they’re always scanning the environment for other people’s needs,” Bjelland says. “Most highly sensitive people need to be taught how to explore internally to learn what they need without always filtering it through other people’s needs.”

Of course, the heightened sensitivity to one’s environment also has benefits. Smith has often heard highly sensitive people talk about spending time in nature because there isn’t as much stimulation there. It is a place where they can escape and delight in the beauty of the natural world.

For some highly sensitive people, listening to a bird chirp or watching a sunset can elicit intense feelings of joy or elation, Sawyer says. Spending time in nature — simply walking barefoot in the grass, for example — can also help calm the nervous system, she adds.

Lombard recommends that counselors take these clients outside if they can or, alternatively, bring the natural world into their offices with nature sounds or a water fountain to help create a sense of calm. Lombard has noticed that clients often feel calmer when they see, touch or hear water, so she frequently has clients listen to the sounds of a rainstorm or flowing brook.

Learning to communicate one’s needs

Although highly sensitive people’s empathetic nature often makes them great partners in life and work, relationship issues are one of the primary reasons that they seek counseling. “Highly sensitive people in relationship are going to be so attuned to what the other person is feeling that sometimes they allow that to dominate over their own needs,” Smith says. For example, they may take on more work to please their boss even when they are already overwhelmed.

Smith finds role-play beneficial for helping these clients learn how to assert themselves in relationships. In counseling, they can safely practice communicating their own needs even if it initially seems strange or dramatic to them, she says.

Because highly sensitive people often hold themselves up to the standards of the 80% of the population that is not highly sensitive, they may not be aware that they need more downtime or need to do less so they can maintain their health and wellness, Sawyer says. To help these clients identify their needs and build new habits and coping strategies, she sometimes has them create a values collage of images that speak to them or make them feel good. Through this visual exercise, clients often will discover a common theme, such as nature. The values collage also serves as a reminder of ways that clients can calm an overstimulated nervous system the next time they find themselves in a stressful or overwhelming situation, Sawyer says.

For example, if a client’s collage contains mainly pictures of the ocean, Sawyer will ask how much time the client is spending near the beach or water. If the client says only once or twice a month, Sawyer will recommend increasing the time that the client engages in activities that will replenish them. For example, the client could go for regular walks on the beach or, if that isn’t feasible, pull up YouTube videos of ocean waves and sounds or simply take a bath to connect with water.

Working with these clients also involves helping them learn to set boundaries and communicate their needs, Sawyer says. She finds that nonviolent communication, an approach developed by psychologist Marshall Rosenberg, is a useful tool for highly sensitive people because it provides them with structure for setting boundaries. This type of communication involves:

  • Observing what does or does not contribute to their well-being
  • Identifying how they feel in relation to what they observed
  • Identifying the needs or values that cause their feelings
  • Making a request to fill that need or have that need met (the concrete actions they would like to see)

Sawyer provides a hypothetical case example. A highly sensitive person is worried about going on vacation with her friends because they are extraverted. The client also fears she will be expected to participate in every activity they have planned and that she won’t get enough downtime. First, Sawyer would help this client identify her needs and preferences for this trip. The client says she would like to have the room farthest away from the common areas because it will provide less stimulation if others stay up late talking. She would also like to tell her friends that she will opt out of an activity to stay in and read.

Next, Sawyer and the client discuss her fear of appearing antisocial if she communicates these needs to her friends. Sawyer uses emotional freedom techniques to help the client ease that fear and calm her nervous system. She asks the client to identify her fear. The client responds, “I feel nervous about talking to my friends.” Sawyer then asks where she feels that fear. The client says, “My stomach feels like it has butterflies.”

After ranking the intensity of the feeling (on a scale from 1 to 10), the client taps different pressure points while repeating the phrase, “Even though I feel nervous about speaking to my friends, I deeply and completely accept myself.” The goal is to have the intensity of her fear drop to a 2 or below.

Next, Sawyer and the client role-play scenarios of the client having this conversation with her friends. For example, she could say, “I’m someone who needs downtime. Would it be OK if I stay in from an outing so I don’t feel so anxious?” or “I’m excited about this trip and love hanging out with you, but I wanted to let you know that I will probably need a couple hours of alone time each day.”

Being a more sensitive counselor

Highly sensitive people “have higher responsivity to counseling interventions,” according to Smith. “Where they have positive fit with the counselor, they do better or they have more of a treatment response, and they seem to get more out of the counseling relationship.”

But how can counselors ensure that they are a good fit for a highly sensitive client? Smith recommends that counselors first think about their own temperament because it will inform any strategy they use. Are they highly sensitive, or are they among the other 80% of the population? At the same time, highly sensitive therapists shouldn’t assume that clients’ experiences are the same as their own, she adds.

“The 80% are very capable of working with highly sensitive people, but they need to be very careful of their own biases because they represent the majority,” Smith continues. “They may jump to a conclusion, or they may have some internalized negative biases of people who are highly sensitive.” If counselors aren’t aware of their internal biases, they risk unintentionally perpetuating some of those negative messages in the therapeutic process, she says. “And the highly sensitive person is coming to counseling because they’re looking for something different than what they’re getting in society.”

The good news is that “many counseling approaches would work well if the counselor is able to adapt it in light of what they know of the client’s high sensitivity,” Smith says. For example, if the counselor stares intently while the client is doing a sand tray intervention, then the client could become overstimulated and have a negative experience, making the intervention less effective, she explains. Instead, the counselor could step back and say, “I’m going to let you do this activity for 10 minutes. I’ll be over here doing my notes.”

Counselors should also think about the way they use language and how the highly sensitive person might perceive it. “The highly sensitive person is probably going to pick up more on nuanced language because, in general,” Smith says, “they’re wired to pick up more subtleties in their environment.” This also includes tone of voice, surroundings in an office, and nonverbal language, she adds.

Bjelland advises counselors to consider the environment in their offices. Is the lighting too bright? Is the client looking into a window? What is the texture of the couch? Does the office have a lot of strong smells such as cleaning products, perfumes or incense?

Smith also cautions counselors to be careful with cognitive behavior therapy. Because highly sensitive people process their environment and emotions deeply, asking them to think about cognitive distortions — the simple ways that the mind convinces a person that something isn’t true — can seem simplistic to them. It can even come across as patronizing to ask a highly sensitive client to reframe a cognition when he or she is having thousands of cognitions on a very deep level, Smith adds. Instead, she suggests saying, “Are these cognitions or depths of processing working well for you, or are these cognitions moving more into rumination?”

Counselors should also be careful when using interventions that might not value the depths of processing because they may unintentionally indicate that there is something wrong with the way the client is processing information, she notes.

Counselors also have the opportunity to reinforce clients’ gift of high sensitivity by validating the strengths and positives of the trait, Smith says. For example, a teacher might feel frustrated because he or she can’t soothe a crying boy. But a highly sensitive child in that same class probably would have noticed that the boy is upset because his crayon rolled under his desk, or the highly sensitive child might even notice the crayon rolling under the desk before the other child does and could grab it and prevent the boy from getting upset in the first place.

Thus, working with highly sensitive people can have far-reaching effects. As Bjelland points out, “You’re really creating a domino impact across the globe when you help a highly sensitive person lift off that layer of overwhelm and help them access those gifts and teach them how to care for their sensitive system because when they are thriving, they go out and help people and make a difference in the world. It’s just who they are.”

 

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The highly sensitive therapist

Many professional counselors don’t just treat highly sensitive clients — they have the sensory processing sensitivity trait themselves. Find out how they manage the benefits and challenges of this trait in the article “Advice for the highly sensitive therapist,” available exclusively at CT Online.

 

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Lindsey Phillips is a contributing writer to Counseling Today and a UX content strategist living in Northern Virginia. Contact her at hello@lindseynphillips.com or through her website at lindseynphillips.com.

 

Letters to the editor: ct@counseling.org

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

Challenging the inevitability of inherited mental illness

By Lindsey Phillips August 29, 2019

With a family history that famously includes depression, addiction, eating disorders and seven suicides — including her grandfather Ernest Hemingway and her sister Margaux — actress and writer Mariel Hemingway doesn’t try to deny that mental health issues run in her family. She repeatedly shares her family history to advocate for mental health and to help others affected by mental illness feel less alone.

And, of course, they aren’t alone. Mental health issues are prevalent in many families, making it natural for some individuals to wonder or worry about the inherited risks of developing mental health problems. Take the common mental health issue of depression, for example. The Stanford University School of Medicine estimates that about 10% of people in the United States will experience major depression at some point during their lifetime. People with a family history of depression have a two to three times greater risk of developing depression than does the average person, however.

A 2014 meta-analysis of 33 studies (all published by December 2012) examined the familial health risk of severe mental illness. The results, published in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin, found that offspring of parents with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder had a 1 in 3 chance of developing one of those illnesses by adulthood — more than twice the risk for the control offspring of parents without severe mental illness.

Jennifer Behm, a licensed professional counselor (LPC) at MindSpring Counseling and Consultation in Virginia, finds that clients who are worried about family mental health history often come to counseling already feeling defeated. These clients tend to think there is little or nothing they can do about it because it “runs in the family,” she says.

Theresa Shuck is an LPC at Baeten Counseling and Consultation Team and part of the genetics team at a community hospital in Wisconsin. She says family mental health history can be a touchy subject for many clients because of the stigma and shame associated with it. In her practice, she has noticed that individuals often do not disclose family history out of their own fear. “Then, when a younger generation person develops the illness and the family history comes out, there’s a lot of blame and anger about why the family didn’t tell them, how they would have wanted to know that, and how they could have done something about it,” she notes.

Sarra Everett, an LPC in private practice in Georgia, says she has clients whose families have kept their history of mental illness a secret to protect the family image. “So much of what feeds mental illness and takes it to an extreme is shame. Feeling like there’s something wrong with you or not knowing what is wrong with you, feeling alone and isolated,” Everett says. Talking openly and honestly about family mental health history with a counselor can serve to destigmatize mental health problems and help people stop feeling ashamed about that history, she emphasizes.

Is mental illness hereditary?

Some diseases such as cystic fibrosis and Huntington’s disease are caused by a single defective gene and are thus easily predicted by a genetic test. Mental illness, however, is not so cut and dry. A combination of genetic changes and environmental factors determines if someone will develop a disorder.

In her 2012 VISTAS article “Rogers Revisited: The Genetic Impact of the Counseling Relationship,” Behm notes that research in cellular biology has shown that about 5% of diseases are genetically determined, whereas the remaining 95% are environmentally based.

The history of the so-called “depression gene” perfectly illustrates the complexity of psychiatric genetics. In the 1990s, researchers showed that people with shorter alleles of the 5-HTTLPR (a serotonin transporter gene) had a higher chance of developing depression. However, in 2003, another study found that the effects of this gene were moderated by a gene-by-environment interaction, which means the genotype would result in depression if people were subjected to specific environmental conditions (i.e., stressful life events). More recently, two studies have disproved the statistical evidence for a relation between this genotype and depression and a gene-by-environment interaction with this genotype.

Even so, researchers keeps searching for disorders that are more likely to “run in the family.” A 2013 study by the Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomic Consortium found that five major mental disorders — autism, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia — appear to share some common genetic risk factors.

In 2018, a Bustle article listed 10 mental health issues “that are more likely to run in families”: schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), ADHD, eating disorders, postpartum depression, addictions and phobias.

Adding to the complexity, Kathryn Douthit, a professor in the counseling and human development program at the University of Rochester, points out that studies on mental disorders are done on categories such as major depression and anxiety that are often based on descriptive terms, not biological markers. The cluster of symptoms produces a “disorder” that may have multiple causes — ones not caused by the same particular genes, she explains.

Thus, thinking about mental health as being purely genetic is problematic, she says. In other words, people don’t simply “inherit” mental illness. A number of biological and environmental factors are at play in gene expression.

Regardless of the genetic link, family history does serve as an indicator of possible risk for certain mental health issues, so counselors need to ask about it. As a genetic counselor, Shuck, a member of the American Counseling Association, admits that she may handle family history intake differently. Genetic counseling, as defined by the National Society of Genetic Counselors, is “the process of helping people understand and adapt to the medical, psychological and familial implications of genetic contributions to disease.” It blends education and counseling, including discussing one’s emotional reactions (e.g., guilt, shame) to the cause of an illness and strategies to improve and protect one’s mental health.

Thus, Shuck’s own interests often lead her to ask follow-up questions about family history rather than sticking to a general question about whether anyone in a client’s family struggles with a certain disorder. If, for example, she learns a client has a family history of depression, she may ask, “Who has depression, or who do you think has depression?” After the client names the family members, Shuck might say, “Tell me about your experiences with those family members. How much has their mental health gotten in the way? How aware were you of their mental health?”

These questions serve as a natural segue to discussing how some disorders have a stronger predisposition in families, so it is good to be aware and mindful of them, she explains. Discussing family history in this way helps to normalize it, she adds.   

Everett, who specializes in psychotherapy for adults who were raised by parents with mental illness, initially avoids asking too many questions. Instead, she lets the conversation unfold, and if a client mentions alcohol use, she’ll ask if any of the client’s family members drink alcohol. Inserting those questions into the discussion often opens up a productive conversation about family mental health history, she says.

Environmental factors

Mental disorders are “really not at all about genetic testing where you’re testing genes or blood samples because there are no specific genetic tests that can predict or rule out whether someone may develop mental illness,” Shuck notes. “That’s not how mental illness works.”

Shuck says that having a family history of mental illness can be thought of along the same lines as having a family history of high blood pressure or diabetes. Yes, having a family history does increase one’s risk for a particular health issue, but it is not destiny, she stresses.

For that reason, when someone with a family history of mental disorders walks into counseling, it is important to educate them that mental health is more than just biology and genetics, Shuck says. In fact, genetics, environment, lifestyle and self-care (or lack thereof) all work together to determine if someone will develop a mental disorder, she explains.

One of Shuck’s favorite visual tools to help illustrate this for clients is the mental illness jar analogy (from Holly Peay and Jehannine Austin’s How to Talk With Families About Genetics and Psychiatric Illness). Shuck tells clients to imagine a glass jar with marbles in it. The marbles represent the genes (genetic factors) they receive from both sides of their family. The marbles also represent one’s susceptibility to mental illness; some people have two marbles in their jar, while others have a few handfuls of marbles.

Next, Shuck explains how one’s lifestyle and environment also fill the jar. To illustrate this point, she has clients imagine adding leaves, grass, pebbles and twigs (representing environmental factors) until the jar is at capacity. “We only develop mental illness if the jar overflows,” she says.

Behm, an ACA member, also uses a simple analogy (from developmental biologist Bruce Lipton) to help explain this complex issue to clients. She tells clients to think of a gene as an overhead light in a room. When they walk into the room, that light (or gene) is present but inactive. They have to change their environment by walking over and flipping on a switch to activate the light.

As Everett points out, “Our experiences, drug use, traumas, these things can turn genes on, especially at a young age.” On the other hand, if someone with a pervasive family history of mental disorders had caregivers who were aware and sought help, the child could grow up to be relatively well-adjusted and healthy in terms of mental health, she says.

In utero epigenetics is another area that illustrates how environment affects our genes and mental health, Douthit notes. The Dutch Hongerwinter (hunger winter) offers an example. In 1944-1945, people living in a Nazi-occupied part of the Netherlands endured starvation and brutal cold because they were cut off from food and fuel supplies. Scientists followed a group who were in utero during this period and found that the harsh environment caused changes in gene expression that resulted in their developing physical and mental health problems across the life span. In particular, they experienced higher rates of depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder and various dementias.

Why is this important to the work of counselors? If, Douthit says, counselors are aware of an environmental risk to young children, such as the altered gene expression coming from the chronic stress and trauma associated with poverty, then they can work with parents and use appropriate therapeutic techniques such as touch therapy interventions in young infants and child-parent psychotherapy to reverse the impact of the harmful
gene expression.

Behm uses the Rogerian approach of unconditional positive regard and “prizing” the client (showing clients they are worth striving for) to create a different environment for clients — one that is ripe for change.

Counseling interventions that change clients’ behaviors and thoughts long term have the potential to also change brain structure and help clients learn new ways of doing and being, Behm continues. “It’s the external factors that are making people anxious or depressed,” she says. “If you get yourself out of that situation, your experience can be different. If you can’t get yourself out of it, the way you perceive it — how you make meaning of it — makes it different in your brain.”

The hope of epigenetics

Historically, genes have been considered sovereign, but genetics don’t tell the entire story, Behm points out. For her, epigenetics is a hopeful way to approach the issue of familial mental illness.

Epigenetics contains the Greek prefix epi, which means “on top of,” “above” or “outside of.” Thus, epigenetics includes the factors outside of the genes. This term can describe a wide range of biological mechanisms that switch genes on and off (evoking the prior analogy of the overhead light). Epigenetics focuses on the expression of one’s genes — what is shaped by environmental influences and life experiences such as chronic
stress or trauma.

Douthit has written and presented on the relationship between counseling and psychiatric genetics, including her 2006 article “The Convergence of Counseling and Psychiatric Genetics: An Essential Role for Counselors” in the Journal of Counseling & Development and a 2015 article on epigenetics for the “Neurocounseling: Bridging Brain and Behavior” column in Counseling Today. In her chapter on the biology of marginality in the 2017 ACA book Neurocounseling: Brain-Based Clinical Approaches, she explains epigenetics as the way that aspects of the environment control how genes are expressed. Epigenetic changes can help people adapt to new and challenging environments, she adds.

This is where counseling comes in. Clients often come to counseling after they have struggled on their own for a while, Behm notes. The repetition of their reactions to their external environment has resulted in a certain neuropathway being created, she explains.

Clients are inundated with messages of diseases being genetic or heritable, but they rarely hear the counternarrative that they can make changes in their lives that will provide relief from their struggle, Behm notes. “Through consistent application of these changes, [clients] can change the structure and function of [their] brain,” she adds. This process is known as neuroplasticity.

Behm explains neuroplasticity to her clients by literally connecting the dots for them. She puts a bunch of dots on a blank piece of paper to represent neurons in the brain. Then, for simplicity, she connects two dots with a line to represent the neuropathway that develops when someone acts or thinks the same way repeatedly. She then asks, “What do you think will happen if I continue to connect these two dots over and over?” Clients acknowledge that this action will wear a hole in the paper. To which she responds, “When I create a hole, then I don’t have to look at the paper to connect the dots. I can do it automatically without looking because I have created a groove. That’s a neuropathway. That’s a habit.”

Even though clients often come in to counseling with unhealthy or undesirable habits (such as responding to an event in an anxious way), Behm provides them with hope. She explains how counseling can help them create new neuropathways, which she illustrates by connecting the original dot on the paper with a new dot.

Of course, the real process is not as simple as connecting one dot to another, but the illustration helps clients grasp that they can choose another path and establish a new way of being and doing, Behm says. The realization of this choice provides clients — including those with family histories of mental illness — a sense of freedom, hope and empowerment, she adds.

At the same time, Behm reminds clients of the power exerted by previously well-worn neuropathways and reassures them that continuing down an old pathway is normal. If that happens, she advises clients to journal about the experience, recording their thoughts and feelings about making the undesirable choice and what they wish they had done or thought differently.

“The very act of writing that out strengthens the [new] neuropathway,” she explains. “Not only did you pause and think about it … you wrote about it. That strengthened it as well.”

In addition, professional clinical counselors can help bring clients’ subconscious thoughts to consciousness. By doing this, clients can process harmful thoughts, make meaning out of the situation, and create a new narrative, Behm explains. The healthy thoughts from the new narrative can positively affect genes, she says.

Protective factors

When patients are confronted with a physical health risk such as diabetes or high blood pressure, they are typically encouraged by health professionals to adjust their behavior in response. Shuck, a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and its psychiatric disorders special interest group, approaches her clients’ increased risk of mental health problems in a similar fashion: by helping them change their behaviors.

Returning to the mental illness jar analogy, Shuck informs clients that they can increase the size of their jars by adding rings to the top so that the “contents” (the genetic and environmental factors) don’t spill over. These “rings” are protective factors that help improve one’s mental health, Shuck explains. “Sleep, exercise, social connection, psychotherapy, physical health maintenance — all of those protective factors that we have control of and we can do something about — [are] what make the jar have more capacity,” she says. “And so, it doesn’t really matter how many marbles we’re born with; it’s also important what else gets put in the jar and how many protective factors we add to it to increase the capacity.”

Techniques that involve a calming sympathetic-parasympathetic shift (as proposed by Herbert Benson, a pioneer of mind-body medicine) may also be effective, Douthit asserts. Activities such as meditation, knitting, therapeutic massage, creative arts, being in nature, and breathwork help cause this shift and calm the nervous system, she explains. Some of these techniques can involve basic behavioral changes that help clients “become aware of when [they’re] becoming agitated and to be able to recognize that and pull back from it and get engaged in things that are going to help [them] feel more baseline calm,”
she explains.

In addition, counseling can help clients relearn a better response or coping strategy for their respective environmental situations, Behm says. For example, a client might have grown up watching a parent respond to external events in an anxious way and subconsciously learned this was an appropriate response. In the safe setting of counseling, this client can learn new, healthy coping methods and, through repetition (which is one way that change happens), create new neuropathways.

At the same time, Shuck and Douthit caution counselors against implying that as long as clients do all the rights things — get appropriate sleep, maintain good hygiene, eat healthy foods, exercise, reduce stress, see a therapist, maintain a medicine regime — that they won’t struggle, won’t develop a mental disorder, or can ignore symptoms of psychosis.

“You can do all of the right things and still develop depression. It doesn’t mean that somebody’s doing something wrong. … It just means there happened to have been more marbles in the jar in the first place,” Shuck says. “It’s [about] giving people the idea that there’s some mastery over some of these factors, that they’re not just sitting helplessly waiting for their destiny to occur.”

Shuck often translates this message to other areas of health care. For example, someone with a family history of diabetes may or may not develop it eventually, but the person can engage in protective factors such as maintaining a healthy body weight and diet, going to the doctor, and getting screened to help minimize the risk. “If we normalize [mental health] and make it very much a part of what we do with our physical health, it’s really not so different,” she says.

Bridging the gap

Shuck started off her career strictly as a genetic counselor. As she made referrals for her genetics clients and those dealing with perinatal loss to see mental health therapists, however, several clients came back to her saying the psychotherapist wasn’t a good fit. Over time, this happened consistently.

This experience opened Shuck’s eyes to the existing gap between the medical and therapeutic professions for people who have chronic medical or genetic conditions. Medical training isn’t typically part of the counseling curriculum, often because there isn’t room or a need for such specialized training, she points out.

Shuck decided to become part of the solution by obtaining another master’s degree, this time in professional counseling. She now works as a genetic counselor and as a psychotherapist at separate agencies. She says some clients are drawn to her because of her science background and her knowledge of the health care setting.

Behm also notes a disconnect between genetics and counseling. “I see these two distinct pillars: One is the pillar of genetic determinism, and the other is the pillar of epigenetics. And with respect to case conceptualization and treatment, there aren’t many places where the two are communicating,” she says.

Douthit, a former biologist and immunologist, acknowledges that some genetic questions such as the life decisions related to psychiatric genetics are outside the scope of practice for professional clinical counselors. However, helping clients to change their unhealthy behaviors and though patterns, deal with family discord or their own reactions (e.g., grief, loss, anxiety) to genetically mediated diseases, and create a sympathetic-parasympathetic shift are all areas within counselors’ realm of expertise, she points out.

An interprofessional approach is also beneficial when addressing familial mental health disorders. If Behm finds herself “stuck” with a client, she will conduct motivational interviewing and then often include a referral to a medical doctor or other medical professional. For example, she points out, depression can be related to a vitamin D deficiency. She has had clients whose vitamin D levels were dangerously low, and after she referred them to a medical doctor to fix the vitamin deficiency, their therapeutic work improved as well.

Another example is the association between addiction and an amino acid deficiency. Behm notes that consulting with a physician who can test and treat this type of deficiency has been shown to reduce clients’ desires to use substances. Even though counselors are not physicians, knowing when to make physicians a part of the treatment team can help improve client outcomes,
she says. 

Another way to bridge the gap between psychotherapy and the science of genetics is to make mental health a natural part of the dialogue about one’s overall health. “Mental illness lives in the organ of the brain, but we somehow don’t equate the brain as an organ that’s of equality with our kidneys, heart or liver,” Shuck says. When there is a dysfunction in the brain, clients deserve the opportunity to make their brains work better because that is important for their overall well-being,
she asserts.

Facing one’s fears

Having a family history of mental illness may result in fear — fear of developing a disorder, fear of passing a disorder on to a child, fear of being a bad parent or spouse because of a disorder.

“Fear is paralyzing,” Shuck notes. “When people are fearful of something … they don’t talk about it and they don’t do anything about it.” The aim in counseling is to help clients move away from feeling afraid — like they’re waiting for the disorder to “happen” — to feeling more in control, she explains.

Some clients have confessed to Everett that they have doubts about whether they want or should have children for several reasons. For instance, they fear passing on a mental health disorder, had a negative childhood themselves because of a parent who suffered from an untreated disorder, or currently struggle with their own mental health. For these clients, Everett explains that having a mental health issue or a family history of mental illness doesn’t mean that they will go on to neglect or abuse their children. “With parents who have the support and are willing to be open and ask for help … [mental illness] can be a part of their life but doesn’t have to completely devastate their children or family,” she says.

Shuck reminds clients who fear that their children could inherit a mental illness that most of the factors that determine whether people develop a mental disorder are nongenetic. In addition, she tells clients their experience with their own mental health is the best tool to help their child if concerns arise because they already know what signs to look for and how to get help.

Even if a child comes from a family with a history of mental illness, the child’s environment will be different from the previous generations, so the manifestations of mental illness could be less or more severe or might not appear at all, Douthit adds.

The potential risk of mental illness may also produce anger in some clients, but as Shuck points out, this can sometimes serve as motivation. One of her clients has a family history that includes substance abuse, addiction, hoarding, anxiety, bipolar disorder, OCD, depression and suicide. The client also experienced mental health problems and had a genetic disorder, but unlike her family, she advocated for herself. When Shuck asked her why she was different from the rest of her family, the client confessed she was angry that she had grown up with family members who wouldn’t admit that they had a mental illness and instead used unhealthy behaviors such as drinking to cope. She knew she wanted a different life for herself and her future children.

Defining their own destiny

Everett doesn’t focus too heavily on client genetics because she can’t do anything about them. Instead, her goal is to encourage clients to believe that they can change and get better themselves. She wants clients to move past their defeated positions and realize that a family history of mental illness doesn’t have to define them.

Likewise, Behm thinks counselors should instill hope and optimism into sessions and carry those things for clients until they are able to carry them for themselves. To do this, counselors should be well-versed in the science of epigenetics and unafraid of clients’ family histories, she says. Practitioners must believe that counseling can truly make a difference and should attempt to grow in their understanding of how the process can alter a client’s genes, she adds.

From the first session, Behm is building hope. She has found that activities that connect the mind and body can calm clients quickly and make them optimistic about future sessions. For example, she may have clients engage in diaphragmatic breathing and ask them what they want to take into their bodies. If their answer is a calming feeling, she tells them to imagine calm traveling into every single cell of their bodies when they breath in. Alternately, clients can imagine inhaling a color that represents calm. Next, Behm asks clients what they want to let go of — stress or anxiety, for example — and has them imagine that leaving the body as they exhale.

Hope and optimism played a large role in how Mariel Hemingway approached her family’s history of mental illness. She recognized that her history made her more vulnerable. Determined not to become another tragic story, Hemingway exerted control over her environment, thoughts and behaviors. Today, she continues to eat well, exercise, meditate and practice stress reduction.

Hemingway’s story illustrates the complexity of familial history and serves as a good model for counselors and clients, Douthit says. “Whether it’s genetic or not, it’s being passed along from generation to generation,” Douthit says. “And that could be through behaviors. It could be through other environmental issues. It could be any number of modifications that occur when genes are expressed.”

Shuck says she often hears other mental health professionals place too great an emphasis on the inheritance of mental illness. A family history of mental illness alone does not determine one’s destiny, she says. Instead, counselors and clients should focus on the things they do have control over, such as environmental factors and lifestyle.

“We have to emphasize wellness [and protective factors] much more than the idea that ‘it’s in my family, so it’s going to happen to me,’” she says. “We have to look at those things we can do as an individual to enhance those aspects of our well-being to make [the capacity of the mental illness] jar bigger.”

 

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Lindsey Phillips is a contributing writer to Counseling Today and a UX content strategist living in Northern Virginia. Contact her at hello@lindseynphillips.com or through her website at lindseynphillips.com.

Letters to the editor: ct@counseling.org

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

Inviting young people to talk about mental health

By Jonathan Rollins March 29, 2019

Lady Gaga is known for her candor and openness when it comes to speaking about her struggles with mental health. But as her mother, Cynthia Germanotta acknowledges that she didn’t initially understand why her famous daughter felt compelled to share so candidly — and without prompting — from the stage.

Over time, however, Germanotta’s perspective changed, especially as she began noticing that when Lady Gaga recounted her struggles, there was almost a visible sense of relief on the faces of many of her fans. “What I came to realize is that [in sharing these details], she was healing and her fans were healing. … I think the fans eventually came to hear her message of resilience and courage as much as the music.”

Speaking in front of approximately 4,000 attendees during her keynote talk Friday morning at the American Counseling Association 2019 Conference & Expo in New Orleans, Germanotta said that experience was the genesis of the Born This Way Foundation, a nonprofit that she and Lady Gaga co-founded in 2012 to empower youth and to eliminate the stigma around mental health.

Today, Germanotta said, she and the other Born This Way Foundation staff members “spend our days inviting conversations around mental health.” One of those staff members, Executive Director Maya Enista Smith, joined Germanotta on stage to facilitate the keynote presentation.

Germanotta shared some of her famous daughter’s backstory, telling the audience that when Lady Gaga (real name, Stefani) was in middle school, she faced a significant degree of taunting and humiliation. This caused her to question her self-worth and resulted in struggles with depression and trauma. These experiences “followed her to high school and college,” Germanotta said, and continued to plague her into her adult life.

As she found her voice, however, Lady Gaga decided to channel that hurt into helping others. She told her mother that she wished she had been better equipped to deal with life’s struggles as a young person and had a desire to give today’s youth the necessary tools to do what she couldn’t at the time.

According to Germanotta, in research conducted through the Born This Way Foundation, access to care (particularly access to affordable care) and simply not knowing where to turn for help are among the top issues impacting youth mental health. In one of the foundation’s studies, it was found that more than 90 percent of youth said they valued their mental health (even more than said they valued their physical health). However, less than 50 percent reported feeling that they had the tools to practice good mental health or knew where to turn for help.

“It’s important to treat mental health; it’s even more important to foster it,” Germanotta said.

Part of overcoming this barrier is simply inviting young people to have conversations around mental health and then giving or pointing them to the tools they need to help themselves and their peers. One of the Born This Way Foundation’s initiatives has been developing a Teen Mental Health First Aid program, developed in partnership with young people, that will be piloted in eight schools later this year.

One of the best things that parents can do — including parents who just so happen to be counselors — is to talk to their children about mental health, Germanotta said. She acknowledged that these discussions can sometimes be awkward, but “normalizing that conversation around mental health” can be a huge source of support for young people and provide them many of the tools they are missing. She also recommended that parents model this talk around the dinner table, “being very honest and open about your own issues and stressors.” One of the main reasons that teenagers don’t turn to their parents for help with mental health struggles is because they don’t hear their parents share about their own challenges openly, Germanotta said.

As for steps that counselors can take, Germanotta again stressed that “young people are struggling with not knowing where to go for that help. … Help them find you, what you do, and what resources are available to them.”

She also said that “one size does not fit all concerning what the answer or resource might be. You really can’t be prescriptive. … It comes back to meeting young people where they are and understanding their needs.”

Finally, Germanotta gave counselors a reminder: “Check your judgment at the door when talking to young people.” Feeling judged is one of the biggest reasons that young people choose not to open up and talk to adults about their struggles, she said.

Germanotta also invited counselors to partner and collaborate with the Born This Way Foundation in reaching young people. “It’s going to take us all,” she said. “We can’t do this alone. … The hope that I have is that this issue is being more recognized every day on a larger scale.”

When Lady Gaga was in college, some of her fellow students started a Facebook page called “Stefani Germanotta Will Never Be Famous.” Perhaps they didn’t realize how hurtful their words and actions might be to a young woman’s emotional and mental health. Regardless, they certainly missed the mark when it came to prognosticating the future Lady Gaga’s worldwide level of recognition and influence.

Fortunately, Lady Gaga is passionate about using her stage not just to boost her own fame, but to preach a message of resilience, kindness and courage — and to validate that it’s perfectly OK to live with, and seek help for, mental health issues.

Germanotta recounted to ACA Conference attendees what her daughter has told her: “Of course I want to be remembered for my music, but what I most want to be remembered for is helping young people change the world.”

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Find out more about the Born This Way Foundation at bornthisway.foundation

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In her own words

Read more about Germanotta’s perspective and experience through two articles she has written:

 

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Jonathan Rollins is the editor-in-chief of Counseling Today. Contact him at jrollins@counseling.org.

Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

 

Building a kinder and braver world

By Bethany Bray March 13, 2019

When Cynthia Germanotta discusses how complicated and misunderstood mental illness can be, she speaks from a place of knowing because her family has lived the reality. Germanotta is the mother of two daughters, the oldest of which, Stefani — better known as Oscar and Grammy Award-winning artist Lady Gaga — is open about her struggles with posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety.

“My husband and I tried our best (and still do!) to be deeply loving and attentive parents, who made sure we had regular family dinners and spent hours talking with our children. But, for all of that communication, we still didn’t really understand exactly what they needed sometimes,” Germanotta wrote in a candid essay last year. “Like many parents, I didn’t know the difference between normal adolescent development and a mental health issue that needed to be addressed, not just waited out. I mistook the depression and anxiety my children were experiencing for the average, if unpleasant, moodiness we all associate with teenagers.”

Cynthia Germanotta

Together, Germanotta and Lady Gaga work to combat the stigma and misunderstanding that often surround mental health issues through the Born This Way Foundation, a nonprofit they co-founded in 2012. Germanotta will speak about mental health and the work of the foundation during her keynote address at the American Counseling Association’s 2019 Conference & Expo in New Orleans later this month.

Through research and youth-focused outreach programs, the Born This Way Foundation works to disseminate information and resources about mental health and help-seeking. Its mission is to “support the wellness of young people and empower them to create a kinder and braver world.”

Counselors, Germanotta asserts, have an important role to play in achieving that goal. She recently shared her thoughts in an email interview with CT Online.

 

Q+A: Cynthia Germanotta, president of the Born This Way Foundation

 

Part of the mission of your foundation is to empower young people to “create a kinder and braver world.” From your perspective, what part do professional counselors have to play in that mission? What do you want them to know?

Building a kinder, braver world takes everyone — including (and especially) counselors. As adults who care about and work with young people, counselors can and do help young people understand how to be kind to themselves, how to cope with the challenges that life will throw their way, and how to take care of their own well-being while they’re busy changing the world.

To us, being brave isn’t something you just have the will to do; it’s something you have to learn how to do and be taught the skills for, and counselors can help young people do that. Counselors are a vital part of the support system that we need to foster for young people so that they are able to lead healthy lives themselves and to build the communities they hope to live and thrive in.

 

What would you share with counselors — from the perspective of a nonpractitioner — about making the decision to seek help for mental health issues or helping a loved one make that decision? How can a practitioner support parents and families in making that decision easier and less associated with shame or stigma?

When you’re struggling with your mental health, asking for help is one of the toughest, bravest and kindest things you can do and, for so many, shame and stigma make these conversations even harder. If that’s going to change (and my team works every day to ensure that it does) we have to normalize discussions of mental health, turning it from something that’s only talked about in moments of crisis to just another regular topic of conversation.

Practitioners can help the people they work with, and their loved ones, learn strategies for talking about mental health, equipping them with the skills they need to communicate about an important part of their lives.

 

What motivated you to accept this speaking engagement to address thousands of professional counselors?

My daughter would be the first one to say, we can’t do this work alone. Fostering the wellness of young people takes all of us working together.

Counselors are such a crucial part of the fabric that surrounds and supports young people, so I was honored to be invited to speak to the American Counseling Association and have the opportunity to not only share our work at Born This Way Foundation, but to hear from (and learn from) this amazing group of practitioners.

 

What can American Counseling Association members expect from your keynote? What might you talk about?

I’m so looking forward to sharing a bit about Born This Way Foundation — why my daughter and I decided to found it, what our mission is and how we’re working toward our goal of building a kinder and braver world, including a couple of new programs we’ve excited to be working on this year.

I’m also excited to share what we’re hearing from young people themselves about mental health. We invest heavily in listening to youth in formal and informal situations, in person, online and through our extensive research. We’ve learned so much through this process, and we have some important insights we’re looking forward to sharing, including the results of our latest round of research where we collected data from more than 2,000 youth about how they perceive their own mental wellness [and] their access to key resources.

 

How have you seen the mental health landscape in the U.S. change since you started the Born This Way Foundation in 2012? Are things changing for the better?

Over the past seven years, we’ve seen real momentum around both the willingness to discuss mental health and the urgency of the challenges that so many young people face. We certainly have a long way to go, but I truly believe we’re starting to move the needle.

There are so many examples of the progress being made on mental health — public figures starting to talk about it, global advocates organizing around it, governments starting to invest in it, schools starting to prioritize it, and so much more.

And, as always, I’m inspired by young people who are so much further ahead on this issue than I think we sometimes give them credit for. In the research we’ve done, about 9 out of 10 young people have consistently said mental health is an important priority. There’s still work to do, but that’s a great foundation to build on.

 

After seven years of working on mental health and the foundation’s youth-focused initiatives, what gives you hope?

Young people give me hope. The youth that we have had the privilege to meet and work with throughout the years are so inspiring, demonstrating time and time again just how innovative, brave and resilient they are.

Young people already recognize mental health as a priority and have the desire and determination to change how society views and treats this fundamental part of our lives. Their bravery and enthusiasm make me excited for the future they will build, and [we are] committed to fostering their leadership and well-being.

 

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Hear Cynthia Germanotta’s keynote talk Friday, March 29, at 9 a.m. at the 2019 ACA Conference & Expo in New Orleans. Find out more at counseling.org/conference.

 

Find out more about the Born This Way Foundation at bornthisway.foundation

 

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In her own words

Read more about Germanotta’s perspective and experience through two articles she has written:

 

 

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Bethany Bray is a staff writer and social media coordinator for Counseling Today. Contact her at bbray@counseling.org.

 

 

Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.