Tag Archives: Mental Health

Inviting young people to talk about mental health

By Jonathan Rollins March 29, 2019

Lady Gaga is known for her candor and openness when it comes to speaking about her struggles with mental health. But as her mother, Cynthia Germanotta acknowledges that she didn’t initially understand why her famous daughter felt compelled to share so candidly — and without prompting — from the stage.

Over time, however, Germanotta’s perspective changed, especially as she began noticing that when Lady Gaga recounted her struggles, there was almost a visible sense of relief on the faces of many of her fans. “What I came to realize is that [in sharing these details], she was healing and her fans were healing. … I think the fans eventually came to hear her message of resilience and courage as much as the music.”

Speaking in front of approximately 4,000 attendees during her keynote talk Friday morning at the American Counseling Association 2019 Conference & Expo in New Orleans, Germanotta said that experience was the genesis of the Born This Way Foundation, a nonprofit that she and Lady Gaga co-founded in 2012 to empower youth and to eliminate the stigma around mental health.

Today, Germanotta said, she and the other Born This Way Foundation staff members “spend our days inviting conversations around mental health.” One of those staff members, Executive Director Maya Enista Smith, joined Germanotta on stage to facilitate the keynote presentation.

Germanotta shared some of her famous daughter’s backstory, telling the audience that when Lady Gaga (real name, Stefani) was in middle school, she faced a significant degree of taunting and humiliation. This caused her to question her self-worth and resulted in struggles with depression and trauma. These experiences “followed her to high school and college,” Germanotta said, and continued to plague her into her adult life.

As she found her voice, however, Lady Gaga decided to channel that hurt into helping others. She told her mother that she wished she had been better equipped to deal with life’s struggles as a young person and had a desire to give today’s youth the necessary tools to do what she couldn’t at the time.

According to Germanotta, in research conducted through the Born This Way Foundation, access to care (particularly access to affordable care) and simply not knowing where to turn for help are among the top issues impacting youth mental health. In one of the foundation’s studies, it was found that more than 90 percent of youth said they valued their mental health (even more than said they valued their physical health). However, less than 50 percent reported feeling that they had the tools to practice good mental health or knew where to turn for help.

“It’s important to treat mental health; it’s even more important to foster it,” Germanotta said.

Part of overcoming this barrier is simply inviting young people to have conversations around mental health and then giving or pointing them to the tools they need to help themselves and their peers. One of the Born This Way Foundation’s initiatives has been developing a Teen Mental Health First Aid program, developed in partnership with young people, that will be piloted in eight schools later this year.

One of the best things that parents can do — including parents who just so happen to be counselors — is to talk to their children about mental health, Germanotta said. She acknowledged that these discussions can sometimes be awkward, but “normalizing that conversation around mental health” can be a huge source of support for young people and provide them many of the tools they are missing. She also recommended that parents model this talk around the dinner table, “being very honest and open about your own issues and stressors.” One of the main reasons that teenagers don’t turn to their parents for help with mental health struggles is because they don’t hear their parents share about their own challenges openly, Germanotta said.

As for steps that counselors can take, Germanotta again stressed that “young people are struggling with not knowing where to go for that help. … Help them find you, what you do, and what resources are available to them.”

She also said that “one size does not fit all concerning what the answer or resource might be. You really can’t be prescriptive. … It comes back to meeting young people where they are and understanding their needs.”

Finally, Germanotta gave counselors a reminder: “Check your judgment at the door when talking to young people.” Feeling judged is one of the biggest reasons that young people choose not to open up and talk to adults about their struggles, she said.

Germanotta also invited counselors to partner and collaborate with the Born This Way Foundation in reaching young people. “It’s going to take us all,” she said. “We can’t do this alone. … The hope that I have is that this issue is being more recognized every day on a larger scale.”

When Lady Gaga was in college, some of her fellow students started a Facebook page called “Stefani Germanotta Will Never Be Famous.” Perhaps they didn’t realize how hurtful their words and actions might be to a young woman’s emotional and mental health. Regardless, they certainly missed the mark when it came to prognosticating the future Lady Gaga’s worldwide level of recognition and influence.

Fortunately, Lady Gaga is passionate about using her stage not just to boost her own fame, but to preach a message of resilience, kindness and courage — and to validate that it’s perfectly OK to live with, and seek help for, mental health issues.

Germanotta recounted to ACA Conference attendees what her daughter has told her: “Of course I want to be remembered for my music, but what I most want to be remembered for is helping young people change the world.”

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Find out more about the Born This Way Foundation at bornthisway.foundation

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In her own words

Read more about Germanotta’s perspective and experience through two articles she has written:

 

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Jonathan Rollins is the editor-in-chief of Counseling Today. Contact him at jrollins@counseling.org.

Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

 

Building a kinder and braver world

By Bethany Bray March 13, 2019

When Cynthia Germanotta discusses how complicated and misunderstood mental illness can be, she speaks from a place of knowing because her family has lived the reality. Germanotta is the mother of two daughters, the oldest of which, Stefani — better known as Oscar and Grammy Award-winning artist Lady Gaga — is open about her struggles with posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety.

“My husband and I tried our best (and still do!) to be deeply loving and attentive parents, who made sure we had regular family dinners and spent hours talking with our children. But, for all of that communication, we still didn’t really understand exactly what they needed sometimes,” Germanotta wrote in a candid essay last year. “Like many parents, I didn’t know the difference between normal adolescent development and a mental health issue that needed to be addressed, not just waited out. I mistook the depression and anxiety my children were experiencing for the average, if unpleasant, moodiness we all associate with teenagers.”

Cynthia Germanotta

Together, Germanotta and Lady Gaga work to combat the stigma and misunderstanding that often surround mental health issues through the Born This Way Foundation, a nonprofit they co-founded in 2012. Germanotta will speak about mental health and the work of the foundation during her keynote address at the American Counseling Association’s 2019 Conference & Expo in New Orleans later this month.

Through research and youth-focused outreach programs, the Born This Way Foundation works to disseminate information and resources about mental health and help-seeking. Its mission is to “support the wellness of young people and empower them to create a kinder and braver world.”

Counselors, Germanotta asserts, have an important role to play in achieving that goal. She recently shared her thoughts in an email interview with CT Online.

 

Q+A: Cynthia Germanotta, president of the Born This Way Foundation

 

Part of the mission of your foundation is to empower young people to “create a kinder and braver world.” From your perspective, what part do professional counselors have to play in that mission? What do you want them to know?

Building a kinder, braver world takes everyone — including (and especially) counselors. As adults who care about and work with young people, counselors can and do help young people understand how to be kind to themselves, how to cope with the challenges that life will throw their way, and how to take care of their own well-being while they’re busy changing the world.

To us, being brave isn’t something you just have the will to do; it’s something you have to learn how to do and be taught the skills for, and counselors can help young people do that. Counselors are a vital part of the support system that we need to foster for young people so that they are able to lead healthy lives themselves and to build the communities they hope to live and thrive in.

 

What would you share with counselors — from the perspective of a nonpractitioner — about making the decision to seek help for mental health issues or helping a loved one make that decision? How can a practitioner support parents and families in making that decision easier and less associated with shame or stigma?

When you’re struggling with your mental health, asking for help is one of the toughest, bravest and kindest things you can do and, for so many, shame and stigma make these conversations even harder. If that’s going to change (and my team works every day to ensure that it does) we have to normalize discussions of mental health, turning it from something that’s only talked about in moments of crisis to just another regular topic of conversation.

Practitioners can help the people they work with, and their loved ones, learn strategies for talking about mental health, equipping them with the skills they need to communicate about an important part of their lives.

 

What motivated you to accept this speaking engagement to address thousands of professional counselors?

My daughter would be the first one to say, we can’t do this work alone. Fostering the wellness of young people takes all of us working together.

Counselors are such a crucial part of the fabric that surrounds and supports young people, so I was honored to be invited to speak to the American Counseling Association and have the opportunity to not only share our work at Born This Way Foundation, but to hear from (and learn from) this amazing group of practitioners.

 

What can American Counseling Association members expect from your keynote? What might you talk about?

I’m so looking forward to sharing a bit about Born This Way Foundation — why my daughter and I decided to found it, what our mission is and how we’re working toward our goal of building a kinder and braver world, including a couple of new programs we’ve excited to be working on this year.

I’m also excited to share what we’re hearing from young people themselves about mental health. We invest heavily in listening to youth in formal and informal situations, in person, online and through our extensive research. We’ve learned so much through this process, and we have some important insights we’re looking forward to sharing, including the results of our latest round of research where we collected data from more than 2,000 youth about how they perceive their own mental wellness [and] their access to key resources.

 

How have you seen the mental health landscape in the U.S. change since you started the Born This Way Foundation in 2012? Are things changing for the better?

Over the past seven years, we’ve seen real momentum around both the willingness to discuss mental health and the urgency of the challenges that so many young people face. We certainly have a long way to go, but I truly believe we’re starting to move the needle.

There are so many examples of the progress being made on mental health — public figures starting to talk about it, global advocates organizing around it, governments starting to invest in it, schools starting to prioritize it, and so much more.

And, as always, I’m inspired by young people who are so much further ahead on this issue than I think we sometimes give them credit for. In the research we’ve done, about 9 out of 10 young people have consistently said mental health is an important priority. There’s still work to do, but that’s a great foundation to build on.

 

After seven years of working on mental health and the foundation’s youth-focused initiatives, what gives you hope?

Young people give me hope. The youth that we have had the privilege to meet and work with throughout the years are so inspiring, demonstrating time and time again just how innovative, brave and resilient they are.

Young people already recognize mental health as a priority and have the desire and determination to change how society views and treats this fundamental part of our lives. Their bravery and enthusiasm make me excited for the future they will build, and [we are] committed to fostering their leadership and well-being.

 

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Hear Cynthia Germanotta’s keynote talk Friday, March 29, at 9 a.m. at the 2019 ACA Conference & Expo in New Orleans. Find out more at counseling.org/conference.

 

Find out more about the Born This Way Foundation at bornthisway.foundation

 

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In her own words

Read more about Germanotta’s perspective and experience through two articles she has written:

 

 

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Bethany Bray is a staff writer and social media coordinator for Counseling Today. Contact her at bbray@counseling.org.

 

 

Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

Study: Genetic wiring as a ‘morning person’ associated with better mental health

By Bethany Bray February 11, 2019

Are you a morning person or a night owl?
Most people consider themselves to be one or the other, with a natural inclination for productivity either in the morning or after sunset.

Not only are these tendencies wired into our genes, but they have a correlation to mental well-being, according to a study published Jan. 29 in the journal Nature. A cohort of researchers found that the genetic tendency toward being a morning person is “positively correlated with well-being” and less associated with depression and schizophrenia.

“There are clear epidemiological associations reported in the literature between mental health traits and chronotype [a person’s ‘circadian preference,’ or tendency toward rising early or staying up late], with mental health disorders typically being overrepresented in evening types. … We show that being a morning person is causally associated with better mental health but does not affect body mass index (BMI) or risk of Type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote.

A person’s tendency toward what the researchers refer to as “morningness” is wired into the genes that regulate our circadian rhythm. In addition to sleep patterns, the body’s circadian rhythm affects hormone levels, body temperature and other processes.

Using data from more than 85,000 people, the researchers found that the sleep timing of those in the top 5 percent of morning persons was an average of 25 minutes earlier than those with the fewest genetic tendencies toward morningness.

The study also highlights the connection, reported by previous research, between schizophrenia and circadian dysregulation and misalignment, as well as the increased frequency of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and depression in people who are night owls.

“One possibility which future studies should investigate is whether circadian misalignment, rather than chronotype itself, is more strongly associated with disease outcomes,” wrote the researchers. “For example, are individuals who are genetically evening people but have to wake early because of work commitments particularly susceptible to obesity and diabetes?”

 

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Read the full study in the journal Nature: nature.com/articles/s41467-018-08259-7

 

From the Australian Broadcasting Corporation: “Early birds have a lower risk of mental illness than night owls, genes show

 

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Related reading from Counseling Today:

 

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Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

 

Counseling Connoisseur: Cannabidiol and mental health therapy

By Cheryl Fisher February 4, 2019

Carol presented with concerns related to continuous panic attacks that were jeopardizing her work as a medical professional. “I can’t think straight when they happen and I cannot be this debilitated when I see patients,” she explained. Carol had also been self-medicating with alcohol on the weekends to “ease the stress.” Throughout a year and half of intensive therapy, Carol’s panic disorder began to subside, but her general anxiety continued. One day during therapy Carol announced, “I have not been anxious for two weeks!” Thrilled for her, I asked what had caused such a significant change. She looked sheepishly at me and whispered, “cannabis.” I inquired whether she had shifted to smoking marijuana versus drinking alcohol (which she had recently begun cutting back on). She quickly responded, “Oh no! That would get me fired from my job. I am taking a cannabidiol tincture.”

 

Geraldine came to therapy having returned from a year deployment to a country that is without sunlight for months at a time and has very limited pharmaceutical access. She had been without her medication for anxiety and depression and was feeling overwhelmed. “I can’t function,” she lamented. She had contacted a psychiatrist, but the only available appointment was a month away. We identified some tools she could use to help ease her symptoms while she waited, but they only worked for short periods of time. As a result, she was constantly anxious and depressed. Three weeks into our work together, Geraldine announced that she was feeling much better and attributed it to the cannabidiol-infused honey that she was using in her morning oatmeal.

 

Tim presented with depression and insomnia related to chronic pain caused by lupus. He had been taking psychotropic medication for years, but it no longer brought him any relief. Despite taking sleep aids, he was unable to get a good night’s sleep. Tim worked hard in therapy and was able to ease some, but not all, of his symptoms through regular mindfulness meditation. To my surprise, Tim appeared one afternoon smiling in delight. “I slept all night this week!” he exclaimed. Again, the answer to his dilemma was cannabidiol, which he consumed in capsules.

 

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As a counselor, I strive to create the best evidence-based, holistic and individualized treatment plans through collaboration with my clients. In addition to traditional talk therapy, I use a variety of therapeutic approaches, including a wide range of expressive arts and animal and nature-assisted therapies. Recently multiple clients have reported symptom improvement through the use of an over-the-counter supplement that works with the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS). Approved in the form of an oral solution (Epidiolex) in June 2018 by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome — rare and severe forms of epilepsy — cannabidiol (CBD) has also drawn interest as a therapeutic agent for use on a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders.

 

What is cannabidiol?

CBD is a naturally derived, non-psychoactive hemp derivative. Proponents describe CBD as a food supplement that provides the therapeutic element of cannabis without tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the component that produces a high. It can be found as a tincture, vapor, infused in honey or creams and is used in food products such as smoothies. Reported side effects include possible positive drug screening results, appetite changes and sleepiness.

How does it work?

CBD affects the ECS, which consists of endogenous cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and the enzymes that synthesize and degrade endocannabinoids. As noted in a 2018 article in the journal Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, research has found that the ECS plays a significant role modulating physiological functions such as mood, cognition, pain perception and “feeding behavior.” The ECS also interacts with the immune system and moderates inflammatory processes. Animal studies and anecdotal observations have shown that modulating the ECS can have beneficial effects on mood, but the authors note that numerous additional factors, such as the placebo effect, could be influencing these findings.

Research that focuses specifically on targeting the ECS with CBD has also been intriguing. In a 2015 article appearing in the journal Neurotherapeutics, a review of studies on animal and limited human populations concluded that acute doses of CBD can reduce anxiety. The authors call for research on chronic doses and note that because past human studies of CBD were conducted with healthy volunteers, future work should focus on clinical populations.

Overall, current research indicates that CBD has significant potential as a treatment for a number of mood disorders.

What does this mean for counselors?

As counselors, it is important to be informed about supplements clients are using to manage mental and physical disease. While we cannot prescribe medications and should refer clients to their doctors for medical advice around pharmacology and supplements, we do have a duty to provide our clients with psychoeducation and research.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

 

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Counselors should be aware that according to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) statement issued in December 2018, although hemp has been removed from the Controlled Substances Act, it is still illegal to add CBD to consumer food products or to market it as a dietary supplement.

Some jurisdictions, such as the cities of New York and Los Angeles, have begun ordering restaurants to stop selling food containing CBD. The FDA is not currently preventing the manufacture of CBD as a dietary supplement. However, counselors and clients should be aware that like all dietary supplements, those containing CBD are not subject to set standards regarding dose or strength.

 

Learn more about risk management issues related to client marijuana use (ACA members only): counseling.org/docs/default-source/risk-management/ct-risk-management-july-2018.pdf

 

FDA statement on CBD cannabis regulation: fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm628988.htm

 

FDA and marijuana Q+A: fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm421168.htm#enforcement_action

 

 

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Cheryl Fisher

Cheryl Fisher is a licensed clinical professional counselor in private practice in Annapolis, Maryland. She is director and assistant professor for Alliant International University California School of Professional Psychology’s online MA in Clinical Counseling.  Her research interests include examining sexuality and spirituality in young women with advanced breast cancer; nature-informed therapy; and geek therapy. She may be contacted at cyfisherphd@gmail.com.

 

 

America’s mental health disparities

By Bethany Bray December 10, 2018

Mental health care availability and access vary tremendously depending on where you live in the United States. In Massachusetts, for example, there is one mental health care provider for every 180 residents. That ratio is far different in Texas and Alabama, however, where there are more than 1,000 residents for every one provider.

Mental Health America (MHA) recently released its annual report of mental health indicators across the U.S. For the ratios above, MHA included counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, and nurses specializing in mental health care in its categorization of “mental health provider.”

MHA ranked Massachusetts as the best state for mental health care availability, followed by the District of Columbia, Maine, Oregon, Vermont, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Alaska and Connecticut. All of these states and the District of Columbia have fewer than 300 residents per mental health care provider.

On the other end of the spectrum, Alabama (with 1,180 residents for every one provider) and Texas (1,010:1) were the lowest-ranked states, along with West Virginia (890:1), Georgia (830:1), Arizona (820:1), Mississippi and Iowa (760:1), Tennessee (740:1), and Florida and Indiana (700:1).

Although Oregon was near the top of MHA’s list for mental health care availability, it also ranked highest for prevalence of mental illness among adults. Nationwide, 18.07 percent of adults – or more than 44 million people – have a mental illness, defined as “a diagnosable mental, behavioral or emotional disorder, other than a developmental or substance use disorder.”

See MHA’s full report, “The State of Mental Health in America 2019,” at mentalhealthamerica.net

In Oregon, that prevalence was 22.61 percent, followed by Utah (22.27 percent), Kentucky (22.08 percent), Idaho (21.62 percent) and Arkansas (21.02 percent). West Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Montana, Colorado and Alaska followed with rates that were between 20 and 21 percent.

States with the lowest prevalence of adult mental illness included New Jersey (15.5 percent), Hawaii (15.55 percent), Illinois (15.73 percent), Texas (16.04 percent) and Maryland (16.59 percent). North Dakota, California, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Arizona, New York, Maine, Delaware, Iowa, Georgia and South Dakota all had rates between 17 and 18 percent.

MHA, a Virginia-based nonprofit advocacy organization, compiles a report titled The State of Mental Health in America each year from nationwide survey data, including information from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Released this fall, MHA’s current report includes statistics on access to mental health care, uninsured citizens, rates of substance abuse, suicide indicators, youth depression and other factors.

See MHA’s full report, “The State of Mental Health in America 2019,” at mentalhealthamerica.net

 

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Mental Health America’s The State of Mental Health in America 2019

When it comes to mental health, how does your state stack up?

View the full report and state rankings at mentalhealthamerica.net

 

See MHA’s full report, “The State of Mental Health in America 2019,” at mentalhealthamerica.net

 

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Follow Counseling Today on Twitter @ACA_CTonline and on Facebook at facebook.com/CounselingToday.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.