Tag Archives: @TechCounselor

@TechCounselor: Streamlining repeat emails

By Adria S. Dunbar April 16, 2018

No matter my professional role, there always seems to exist the need to send out the same email over and over again. Either I write the same email monthly or annually, or I write the same email and send it to multiple people.

When I was in private practice, it was a “New Client” email. As a school counselor, it was usually an introductory email to parents and students. Now, as a counselor educator, my repeat emails are related to admissions and advising. Regardless of the content, I can help you streamline this process to save yourself a lot of time.

The first step is to embrace Google Sheets. Even if you don’t enjoy Sheets (or similar software programs such as Excel or Numbers), I can promise you that Sheets is one of the best tools to help you manage your email. Create a sheet, or multiple sheets, with the following columns:

  • First Name
  • Last Name
  • Email Address

Those three columns are the basic necessities to make this work, but feel free to add others. Oh, and capitalization matters.

Once you have your columns set up on the first row of your spreadsheet and have input all of your data, click on “Add-ons” and then “Get Add-ons.” Search for “Yet Another Mail Merge (YAMM)” and download the software. Get ready to be amazed at how easy this is!

Compose an email to all of your recipients. You might want to include some personalization, such as “Good morning, {{First Name}},” or “Hello, Dr. {{Last Name}}.” Your spreadsheet might also include a column titled, “Appointment Date,” in which case you could include that in the body of your email. For example, “We are excited that you will be visiting us on {{Appointment Date}} and look forward to working with you.” Once your email is complete and saved (Google autosaves for you), you’re ready to use YAMM.

Go back to your Google Sheets. Click Add-ons > Yet Another Mail Merge > Start Mail Merge. Choose the Sender Name and the Email Template you’d like to use. YAMM gives you a list of your most recently composed emails. You can also choose to track emails to see if and when recipients receive or open your message. Finally, you can also delay your email to send at a specific date and time. This is great for those of us who tend to be working late at night or over the weekends. However, you can also send right away. In either case, you may want to use the “Send Test Email” feature just to be sure your email sends in the way you intended.

For even more advanced options, check out how to convert Google Docs to Emails using a Chrome Extension. This will help you create branded or creative email messages that will really impress your recipients.

 

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Adria S. Dunbar is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She has more than 15 years of experience with both efficient and inefficient technology in school settings, private practice and counselor education. Contact her at adria.dunbar@ncsu.edu.

 

@TechCounselor’s Instagram is @techncounselor.

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

@TechCounselor: Creating email signatures

By Adria S. Dunbar March 22, 2018

We’ve all heard that a first impression is incredibly important, so we get dressed up, pay attention to our choice of words and do everything we can to present our most professional selves to the world.

Sometimes, however, we don’t have the opportunity as counselors to put our best foot forward in the literal sense. Instead, we must rely on digital communication for a first meeting. Believe it or not, your email signature says a lot about who you are. I will keep this article short and sweet, just like your email signature should be.

 

Here are some tips for creating an effective email signature:

 

  • Think carefully about the photo you upload. Make sure it is a recent photo, a high-quality image and appropriate for your professional setting. If you don’t have a photo you like, perhaps you can choose a logo instead.
  • Link to your social media, but only if it is up to date. No one wants to read your tweets from 2009!
  • Do not include your email address. If recipients have your email signature, they have your email address.
  • Lead people to what you want them to learn about you. This might be your Twitter account, but it could be your webpage or your Instagram instead.
  • Think about using a booking site (Adria uses youcanbook.me/) so that people can book an appointment with you from your email signature.

 

Your email signature should be simple, effective and functional. Here is an example that Adria created with WiseStamp, a free email signature creator.

 

 

 

 

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Adria S. Dunbar is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She has more than 15 years of experience with both efficient and inefficient technology in school settings, private practice and counselor education. Contact her at adria.dunbar@ncsu.edu.

 

@TechCounselor’s Instagram is @techncounselor (instagram.com/techcounselor/).

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

@TechCounselor: Translating emails into efficient to-do lists

By Adria S. Dunbar and Beth A. Vincent February 14, 2018

This month, we return to our common email issues faced by counselors. The question we have been asking (and answering) is: Which inbox issue are you trying to solve?

  1. a) I write emails during nonworking hours (e.g., 4 a.m., weekends, holidays).
  2. b) The number of emails I get each day is out of control.
  3. c) I need to translate my emails into tasks on a to-do list.
  4. d) My email signature leads people nowhere.
  5. e) I write the same email over and over again.

In this column, we are talking to everyone who answered “C” to the question above. That’s all of the counselors out there who need a little extra help translating emails into tasks on their to-do lists.

As counselors, we get a lot of emails. If you’re like us, you may even get hundreds of emails every week. Very often, these emails come from a variety of sources. In one day, a counselor may receive an email from a client asking to reschedule an appointment, a request to sign and return a release of information form and a call for conference presentation proposals for the state counseling conference.

Buried within these email messages are tasks that need to be accomplished, all with various deadlines and differing priority levels. All of these to-do’s can easily get lost or forgotten. As counselors, we don’t want to let people down or not fulfill an obligation, but without a means to set reminders or make a note, that is likely happen. This is especially true for those of us who check our email from our phones, when we are not necessarily in a place to use sticky notes or a whiteboard to help us keep track. One system we use to help manage our to-do’s is an app called Google Keep. Keep is a free application that Google developed to create digital sticky notes and reminders. It is available in both desktop and mobile application form, allowing you access to your to-do lists no matter where you are.

Notice that we said “lists” — as in the plural form. If you’re a sticky-note lover like us, you’ll be pleased to learn that you can make practically unlimited numbers of digital sticky notes (called “categories”) that you can color-code, share with others and prioritize. You can also set location and date reminders.

For example, you could create a to-do list for your client needs, administrative tasks, professional development and personal errands all in one place. Another way to use this feature is to create categories depending on the task’s priority level or deadline date.

For those with more advanced sticky-note skills, color-coding your notes can help distinguish your personal categories from your professional categories or your shared notes from your private notes. Oh, and you can pin the ones you use the most to help move your most important items to the top of your list and keep them there.

Once you have set up your categories, you can easily go into the app or desktop feature and simply type or dictate your tasks one at a time. Once your items are on your list, you can even add check boxes. So, if you are one of those people who get a very satisfying feeling when marking an item off of your list, this feature is for you. The app keeps a record of each item you enter and mark off your list in case you want to keep this information for your records or revisit how much you’ve actually accomplished.

In addition, you can set reminders for your various to-do’s so that you can receive notifications based on date and time or physical location. This can be helpful for reminding you to call Client B when you get to the office or to submit your conference presentation proposal by the deadline date.

Another way this app can help simplify your life is through the sharing feature. You can share your to-do list categories with anyone you work with. For example, let’s say you are planning an outreach presentation with a co-worker. Use Keep to create a shared task list by adding a collaborator to your list, and see in real time when your co-worker has completed a task.

So, how do we use Google Keep to manage our email tasks? We keep it pulled up on our desktops and on our phones each time that we open our inboxes. This way, as soon as we receive that professional membership expiration notice, we simply type it into our Google Keep to-do list and keep moving on with our day. This helps us set boundaries with our email — i.e., not mindlessly checking it when we are not ready to sit down and act on it — and allows us to avoid those stressful situations when it feels like an important task might have slipped through the cracks.

 

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Adria S. Dunbar is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She has more than 15 years of experience with both efficient and inefficient technology in school settings, private practice and counselor education. Contact her at adria.dunbar@ncsu.edu.

 

Beth A. Vincent is an assistant professor at Campbell University in Buies Creek, North Carolina, in counselor. She is a counselor educator, licensed school counselor and former career counselor who is driven to learn everything there is to know about innovative productivity software so that she can help counselors be their most present selves. Contact her at evincent@campbell.edu.

 

Our Instagram is @techncounselor (instagram.com/techcounselor/).

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling 

 

@TechCounselor: A better way to email, Part II

By Adria S. Dunbar and Beth A. Vincent January 4, 2018

Last month, we asked readers, the following question:

Which inbox issue are you trying to solve?

  1. a) I write emails during nonworking hours (e.g., 4 a.m., weekends, holidays).
  2. b) The number of emails I get each day is out of control.
  3. c) I need to translate my emails into tasks on a to-do list.
  4. d) My email signature leads people nowhere.
  5. e) I write the same email over and over again.

For those who answered, “I write emails during nonworking hours,” we suggested that you try a Google add-on called Boomerang. Sidenote: Boomerang just released an email app, so if you took our suggestion and like what you found, you might want to check that out.

If your email issues aren’t solved yet, keep reading. This month we are tackling answer b) The number of emails I get each day is out of control.

How many times a week are you asked the question, “May we have your email address?” This has resulted in fewer ads to toss from our mailboxes, but so much junk cluttering our inboxes. Here are some strategies for tackling this clutter. We hope that one or two of these suggestions will work for you.

1) Use a different email address. Maybe you have an old Yahoo address lying around somewhere. It used to be your go-to email address, but then Gmail came along, and your Yahoo account has long since been abandoned. Put that address back in the rotation. When the clerk at the grocery store asks for your email address and promises a 5 percent incentive for providing one, give out the email address that you rarely use. This separates the promotions and junk mail from email that is personally addressed to you.

2) File email in folders. Many email services now offer different folder options for social and promotional email. They will even automatically “move” emails into these folders for you based on the sender and number of recipients. Some people also set filters to automatically send specific emails to named folders.

3) Use email apps. One approach to try is to use different email apps for your different email addresses. Rather than including all of your email accounts in one place, keep them separate. For example, you could use Inbox to manage your personal email and the native Mail app on your iPhone to manage your work email. This also helps you not to see work emails on weekends and evenings when you are searching for emails like the buy one, get one sale at your favorite store.

4) Stop the notifications. We read somewhere that we are becoming a bit addicted to “breaking news.” It used to be that a notification meant something, but now notifications happen constantly. Take back your peace. Stop the email notifications (or pause them temporarily) until you need them. Want to know if a flight is delayed? OK, maybe keep that one. Notifications from your bank about deposits and withdrawals? OK, that seems important too. But think long and hard about some of the other nonurgent notifications you may be receiving and make a conscious choice to turn them off. You can always turn them back on if you miss them.

5) Unroll.me. If you’re already drowning in email and are weeding through promos and notifications, you can use Unroll.me to see all of your email subscriptions in one place. You’ll be shocked to see how many subscriptions you receive! Knowing how many email subscriptions you have is half the battle. You can use this tool to unsubscribe from various email lists all at once, or create a “Rollup,” which allows you to get one email per day featuring all the emails and promos you’ve selected. Unroll.me creates an email digest so that you can look at all of the information once a day, saving you time and energy while keeping your inbox clean.

6) Say no thank you. As counselors, we tell our clients all the time to set better boundaries. It’s OK to decline when a company asks for your email address.

Clerk: “What’s a good email address for you?”

Us: “No thank you.”

That’s one less email we have to delete on a regular basis!

We hope these email tips will help you spend less time clearing out email and more time on what is important to you. Check back next month to learn strategies to translate your email into a to-do list.

 

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Adria S. Dunbar is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She has more than 15 years of experience with both efficient and inefficient technology in school settings, private practice and counselor education. Contact her at adria.dunbar@ncsu.edu.

 

Beth A. Vincent is an assistant professor at Campbell University in Buies Creek, North Carolina, in counselor. She is a counselor educator, licensed school counselor and former career counselor who is driven to learn everything there is to know about innovative productivity software so that she can help counselors be their most present selves. Contact her at evincent@campbell.edu.

 

Our Instagram is @techncounselor (instagram.com/techcounselor/).

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

@TechCounselor: A better way to email, Part I

By Adria S. Dunbar and Beth A. Vincent December 11, 2017

Most of us have a love-hate relationship with email. Luckily, there are many software solutions to help counselors and counselor educators handle email more efficiently. Let’s begin by identifying the email issues you want to fix. If you choose more than one, don’t worry. We will take it one step at a time.

 

1) Which inbox issue are you trying to solve?

  1. a) I write emails during nonworking hours (e.g., 4 a.m., weekends, holidays).
  2. b) The number of emails I receive each day is out of control.
  3. c) I need to translate my emails into tasks on a to-do list.
  4. d) My email signature leads people nowhere.
  5. e) I write the same email over and over again.

 

We will spend the next few months addressing each of these types of email issues, one at a time. For those who chose “I write emails during nonworking hours,” we suggest an email add-on that might save you a lot of time and energy. It’s called Boomerang (boomerangapp.com/), and it just might make your life with email a little easier.

 

Counselors, meet Boomerang

We are all trying our best to set boundaries with work and work-related tasks. Maybe you like to spend your Saturday mornings catching up on work, but sending an email on a Sunday evening or Saturday morning alerts people to the fact that you are available and working. Or perhaps you are a night owl who writes emails at 3 a.m. The meta-communication of when we send our emails says something to the recipients.

Regardless of your counseling role, email is a reality of the working world. Now that the majority of people have a smartphone, our emails tend to follow us everywhere — even when we are not physically present at the office. Everyone manages his or her connectedness differently, but as counselors, it can be challenging to set boundaries when it comes to responding to emails from clients, students or co-workers. Unfortunately, it can be easier to just go ahead and respond immediately rather than risking the sometimes unavoidable reality of forgetting to follow up at a later time.

Boomerang is a helpful tool that allows you to schedule when your emails get sent. What this means is that you can write and respond to an email whenever you choose — maybe that is at night after your children have gone to bed, or on the weekend when you said you weren’t going to be checking your email. Regardless, you can schedule the email to be sent to your client’s inbox at 8 a.m. on a Tuesday morning during normal “business” hours. This can help us as counseling practitioners or counselor educators to model better communication boundaries to our clients and students (i.e., suggesting that we are not instantly accessible) by limiting communication times and creating a culture of self-care.

In addition to setting boundaries, Boomerang allows you to schedule emails ahead of time, whether that is hours, days, weeks or months in advance. For example, perhaps you are planning a workshop or group event that is a month away, but you already have a list of attendees who have RSVP’d. Using Boomerang, you can write your email reminder now and schedule that email to be sent to attendees a week before your event takes place. This takes the pressure off of you to remember to send a reminder email.

Boomerang does come with some limitations. The tool is accessible both for Gmail and Outlook users. However, currently, you can schedule only 10 emails per month using the free version. Once you hit your 10-email limit, you are unable to schedule additional emails until a new month begins (unless you pay a monthly fee for the service).

In our view, there are definitely benefits to the paid services. For $5 a month, you can schedule messages to return to the top of your inbox at a set date, while also including a note to yourself with next steps or reminders. You also receive mobile access to the application. For additional fees each month, other features are available, including unlimited emails with Boomerang, recurring messages (e.g., weekly, monthly, yearly), a setting that allows you to pause email notifications and a setting to prioritize a VIP list of senders.

Whether wishing to disconnect a bit more, wanting to be more organized with your recurring messages or just needing reminders of the emails you sent that no one replied to, Boomerang can be a tool to help counselors reduce some of the mental clutter that we all experience because of our very full inboxes.

 

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Adria S. Dunbar is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and Human Development at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. She has more than 15 years of experience with both efficient and inefficient technology in school settings, private practice and counselor education. Contact her at adria.dunbar@ncsu.edu.

 

Beth A. Vincent is an assistant professor at Campbell University in Buies Creek, North Carolina, in counselor. She is a counselor educator, licensed school counselor and former career counselor who is driven to learn everything there is to know about innovative productivity software so that she can help counselors be their most present selves. Contact her at evincent@campbell.edu.

 

Our Instagram is @techncounselor (instagram.com/techcounselor/).

 

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Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.